Science Inventory

Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes

Citation:

Painter, M. L., C. L. Chambers, M. Siders, R. R. Doucett, J. O. Whitaker, Jr., AND D. L. PHILLIPS. Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY. NRC Research Press, Ottawa, Canada, 87:865-875, (2009).

Impact/Purpose:

We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum, Allen, 1891) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable-carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey.

Description:

We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum (J.A. Allen, 1891)) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey. We collected 33 fecal samples from spotted bats and trapped 3755 insects where bats foraged. Lepidopterans averaged 99.6% of feces by volume; other insects were not a major component of diet. The δ13C and δ15N values of bat feces were similar to those of moths from families Noctuidae (N), Lasiocampidae (L), and Geometridae (G), but differed from Arctiidae (A) and Sphingidae (S). We used a mixing model to reconstruct diet; three families (N, L, G) represented the majority (88%–100%) of the diet with A + S representing 0%–12%. Although we compared δ13C and δ15N values of wing, hair, and feces of spotted bats, feces best represented recent diet; wing and hair were more enriched than feces by 3‰ and 6‰, respectively. This pattern was consistent with that reported for other bat species. We suggest that spotted bats persist across a wide latitudinal gradient partly because they can forage on a variety of noctuid, geometrid, and lasiocampid moths. Using visual fecal inspection with stable isotope analysis provided information on families of moths consumed by an uncommon bat species

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 10/01/2009
Record Last Revised: 11/30/2009
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 209890

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION

ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS BRANCH