Science Inventory

Differential incorporation of natural spawners vs. artificially planted salmon carcasses in a stream food web: Evidence from delta 15N of juvenile coho salmon

Citation:

SHAFF, C. AND J. E. COMPTON. Differential incorporation of natural spawners vs. artificially planted salmon carcasses in a stream food web: Evidence from delta 15N of juvenile coho salmon. FISHERIES. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, MD, 34(2):62-72, (2009).

Impact/Purpose:

Placement of salmon carcasses is a common restoration technique in Oregon and Washington streams, with the goal of improving food resources and productivity of juvenile salmon. To explore the effectiveness of this restoration technique, we measured the δ15N of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) as an index of the incorporation of salmon-derived nutrients (SDN) in streams with varying amounts of natural spawners and artificially placed carcasses.

Description:

Placement of salmon carcasses is a common restoration technique in Oregon and Washington streams, with the goal of improving food resources and productivity of juvenile salmon. To explore the effectiveness of this restoration technique, we measured the δ15N of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) as an index of the incorporation of salmon-derived nutrients (SDN) in streams with varying amounts of natural spawners and artificially placed carcasses. Although δ15N of juvenile coho salmon increased with salmon carcass mass in the stream channel, this relationship was only significant for natural spawners. Artificially placed carcasses did not appear to increase SDN utilization by juvenile coho salmon. Possible explanatory factors include the restricted spatial and temporal distribution of carcasses, general absence of eggs, and lack of substrate bioturbation associated with artificially placed carcasses. Our study suggests that artificially placed carcasses at the levels added in the Oregon Coast Range may not directly mimic the role of natural spawners in stream foodwebs.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 02/01/2009
Record Last Revised: 03/26/2009
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 190191