Science Inventory

PRESENTED AT TRIANGLE CONSORTIUM FOR REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY MEETING IN CHAPEL HILL, NC ON 2/11/2006: SPERM COUNT DISTRIBUTIONS IN FERTILE MEN

Citation:

STRADER, L. F., S. C. JEFFAY, A. H. HERRING, A. F. OLSHAN, L. E. BRADLEY, J. C. SMITH, AND S. D. Perreault. PRESENTED AT TRIANGLE CONSORTIUM FOR REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY MEETING IN CHAPEL HILL, NC ON 2/11/2006: SPERM COUNT DISTRIBUTIONS IN FERTILE MEN. Presented at Triangle Consortium for Reproductive Biology, Chapel Hill, NC, February 11, 2006.

Impact/Purpose:

Presentation

Description:

Sperm concentration and count are often used as indicators of environmental impacts on male reproductive health. Existing clinical databases may be biased towards sub-fertile men with low sperm counts and less is known about expected sperm count distributions in cohorts of fertile men. We are surveying semen quality in a selected cohort of presumed fertile men (n=228) who are resident partners of pregnant women. These couples live in the metropolitan areas of 3 mid-sized cities in the US, selected for availability of environmental monitoring data. Semen was collected at home and cold-shipped to a central lab for analysis the following morning. For sperm concentration (106/ml semen determined by hemacytometer), mean = 147 ? 115.6 (SD), median = 114 and % < 20 (the WHO reference value) = 3.9%. For volume (ml), mean = 3.3 ? 1.7 and median = 3.0. For total sperm count (106), mean = 463 ? 410, median = 325, and % < 40 = 2.2%. Compared with another cohort of 156 fertile US men reported by Zinamen et al. (J. Androl 21:145, 2000), these values are relatively high. Differences in mean concentrations and counts by city of residence were statistically significant overall, p<0.01 (log-transformed, PROC GLM, SAS, controlling for abstinence). The city with the highest mean sperm concentration (169 ? 136, n=90) was different from that with the lowest (126 ? 92, n=46), p<0.02. These data will be used, in combination with other semen outcomes, to examine associations with other factors including lifestyle and environmental/occupational exposures. This preliminary analysis suggests that recently fertile men may have higher than expected sperm concentrations and counts, and that geographic differences in these outcomes may be detectable in relatively small cohorts of fertile men. Funded by CR 829327 (AFO). Disclaimer: This abstract does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 02/11/2006
Record Last Revised: 01/21/2008
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 148350