Science Inventory

Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

Citation:

Pleil, J. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers. Journal of Breath Research. Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, Uk, 10(1):010201, (2016).

Impact/Purpose:

Traditionally, JBR has published articles on human breath analysis for diagnosing disease, tracking health state, assessing the dose and effect of exogenous chemicals, and contributions of malodorous compounds from the oral/nasal cavity. These have also included research describing novel sampling and analytical technologies, most notably those implementing mass spectrometry, chemical sensors and optical measurement instrumentation (Amann and Smith 2013). The journal’s original scope has also embraced animal models as surrogates for human sampling, new mathematical and statistical data interpretation methods, as well as physiological parameters (volume, speed, and frequency) of breathing as effects markers. These topics represent the primary focus of medical and public health breath research (http://iopscience.iop.org/1752-7163/page/Scope). But, contemporary breath research is becoming much more than interpreting systemic gas exchange and excretion of gas-phase waste products and so JBR the scope of publication to capture these exciting new research areas (Pleil 2015).

Description:

This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The express purpose is to provide a publication outlet for novel breath related research that includes in vitro studies, especially those that explore the biological origin and expression of compounds that may ultimately influence the constituents of exhaled breath. The new topics include all manner of methods and instrumentations for making in vivo and in vitro measurements, the use of different biological media (blood, urine saliva, swabs) including human and microbial cell-lines, in vitro kinetic studies of metabolism, and advances in ex vivo methods for maintaining metabolic competency and viability of biological samples.

URLs/Downloads:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/10/1/010201   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 03/08/2016
Record Last Revised: 03/16/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 311369