Science Inventory

INDICATORS OF UV EXPOSURE IN CORALS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND CORAL BLEACHING

Citation:

Anderson, S. L., J. Machula, G. Cherr, R G. Zepp, D L. Santavy, L J. Hansen, AND E. Mueller. INDICATORS OF UV EXPOSURE IN CORALS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND CORAL BLEACHING. HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT 7(5):1271-1282, (2001).

Impact/Purpose:

The overall objective of this task is to develop quantitative relationships for assessing the vulnerability of aquatic resources to global change. The task will contribute experimental and modeling tools for assessments of the interactions of global climate and UV changes with coral reefs and selected watersheds and estuaries in the U.S. These activities are contributing primarily to two APGs in the ecosystems component of the Global Change Research Multiyear Plan: the 2006 APG (APG 3) on building the capacity to assess global change impacts on coastal aquatic ecosystems, including coral reefs and estuaries and the 2004 APG (APG 2) on building capacity to assess and respond to global change impacts on selected watersheds. One major task objective is to assess interactions of global warming and UV exposure that are contributing to the observed coral bleaching and disease. Our lab is working with scientists at the NHEERL Gulf Ecology Lab to characterize UV exposure and effects at several coral reef sites. Other research in this task is examining the interactions between UV-induced breakdown of refractory organic matter in estuaries and coastal areas that enhance UV penetration into the water and concurrently form biologically-labile nitrogen-, phosphorus- and carbon-containing substances that stimulate productivity and microbial activity. This task also involves research in central Brazil that is part of the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment (LBA). The objectives of this project are to assess the impacts of land use and climatic changes on soil nutrient cycles and microbiota, trace gas exchange and water quality in the Brazilian cerrado. This work involves a close collaboration between EPA and a group of scientists from the Department of Ecology, University of Brasilia, Brazil. Other objectives of this task are to assess the interactions of land use and climate changes with the ecological functioning of streams in watersheds of the Piedmont region of the southestern U.S.

Description:

A compelling aspect of the deterioration of coral reefs is the phenomenon of coral bleaching. Through interactions with other factors such as sedimentation, pollution, and bacterial infection, bleaching can impact large areas of a reef with limited recovery, and it might be induced by a variety of stressors including temperature and salinity extremes, and ultraviolet
light. Under conditions of ocean warming, often associated with calm and stratified waters, photobleaching of UV-absorbing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is increased, and penetration of both UV-B. and UV-A is greatly enhanced. Indices of UV-specific effects in coral tissue are needed to test whether UV increases, associated with global climate change,
are harmful to corals. To address this challenge, we have evaluated UV-specific effects in corals and have characterized factors that alter penetration of UV radiation over coral reefs. An immunoblotting assay was developed to examine UV-specific lesions (thymine dimers) in coral and zooxanthellae DNA. We observed dose-dependent increases of thymine dimers in coral (Porites porites var porites) exposed to artificial solar irradiance in a solar simulator, although effects were not strictly proportional. UV measurements were made in July 1999 at Eastern Sambo reef and nearby sites, including profiling along transects from reef to shore. Results of these analyses indicate that the coral at Eastern Sambo reef (at 34 meters) were receiving UV-B radiation that was equivalent to 25 to 30% of surface UV irradiance. However, the water just inside the reef in Hawk Channel (located closer to land) was considerably more opaque to UV. This water photobleached with loss of UV absorbance and fluorescence when it was exposed to simulated solar radiation. These results indicate that photobleaching of the DOM and transport of near-shore water out over the reefs might play a key role in controlling UV penetration to the reef surface.

URLs/Downloads:

CORAL BLEACHING ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 97 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 10/01/2001
Record Last Revised: 03/18/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 65094