Science Inventory

Low-Cost Air Quality Monitoring Tools: From Research to Practice (A Workshop Summary)

Citation:

Clements, A., W. Griswold, A. RS, J. Johnston, M. Herting, J. Thorson, A. Collier-Oxandale, AND M. Hannigan. Low-Cost Air Quality Monitoring Tools: From Research to Practice (A Workshop Summary). Sensors. MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 17(11):2478, (2017).

Impact/Purpose:

In the United States, air quality has traditionally been measured according to a metric established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) using equipment that implement a federal reference method (FRM) or federal equivalent method (FEM). These devices cost tens of thousands of dollars and require significant infrastructure and trained personnel to operate [1]. Within the last ten years, miniaturization and other technological advances have brought to market a number of low-cost (<$2,500) sensors designed to measure atmospheric particles and gasses.air p Although sensors cannot replace traditional FRM/FEM monitors, these sensors have created new opportunities for broadening access to ambient air quality monitoring for applications such as personal health and sub-regional air quality assessment [2, 3].

Description:

In May 2017, a two-day workshop was held in Los Angeles (California, U.S.A.) to gather practitioners who work with low-cost sensors used to make air quality measurements. The community of practice included individuals from academia, industry, non-profit groups, community-based organizations, and regulatory agencies. The group gathered to share knowledge developed from a variety of pilot projects in hopes of advancing the collective knowledge about how best to use low-cost air quality sensors. Panel discussion topics included: (1) best practices for deployment and calibration of low-cost sensor systems, (2) data standardization efforts and database design, (3) advances in sensor calibration, data management, and data analysis and visualization, and (4) lessons learned from research/community partnerships to encourage purposeful use of sensors and create change/action. Panel discussions summarized knowledge advances and project successes while also highlighting the questions, unresolved issues, and technological limitations that still remain within the low-cost air quality sensor arena.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/17/11/2478   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 11/01/2017
Record Last Revised: 10/30/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 338095

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

EXPOSURE METHODS & MEASUREMENT DIVISION