Science Inventory

Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA

Citation:

Hoghooghi, N., D. Radcliffe, M. Habteselassie, AND J. Jeong. Modeling the Effect of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrate Load Using SWAT in an Urban Watershed of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. American Geophysical Union 2016 Fall Meeting, San Francisco, California, December 11 - 16, 2016.

Impact/Purpose:

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrate (NO3-) contamination in both surface and ground waters as a result of failing or high density systems. In metropolitan Atlanta, more than 26% of homes are on OWTS and this percentage is expected to increase with population growth. OWTS failure for GA was reported at a rate of 1.7% (U.S. EPA, 2002). In 12 urban watersheds of metropolitan Atlanta with OWTS density greater than 75 OWTS km-2 dual-isotope analysis of nitrogen and oxygen of NO3- during base flow condition demonstrated that NO3- originated predominantly from OWTS (Hoghooghi et al., 2016). To predict the effect of OWTS on stream flow in the Big Haynes Creek watershed in metropolitan Atlanta a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was developed. The study found that with the presence of OWTS total water yield increased about 3% (Oliver et al., 2014). However, the impact of OWTS on NO3- load was not included in their model and neither were failing OWTSs.

Description:

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) can be a source of nitrate (NO3-) contamination in both surface and ground waters as a result of failing or high density systems. In metropolitan Atlanta, more than 26% of homes are on OWTS and this percentage is expected to increase with population growth. OWTS failure for GA was reported at a rate of 1.7% (U.S. EPA, 2002). In 12 urban watersheds of metropolitan Atlanta with OWTS density greater than 75 OWTS km-2 dual-isotope analysis of nitrogen and oxygen of NO3- during base flow condition demonstrated that NO3- originated predominantly from OWTS (Hoghooghi et al., 2016). To predict the effect of OWTS on stream flow in the Big Haynes Creek watershed in metropolitan Atlanta a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was developed. The study found that with the presence of OWTS total water yield increased about 3% (Oliver et al., 2014). However, the impact of OWTS on NO3- load was not included in their model and neither were failing OWTSs.

URLs/Downloads:

https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2016/   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/POSTER)
Product Published Date: 12/16/2016
Record Last Revised: 12/20/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 334186