Science Inventory

Performance Evaluation and Community Application of Low-Cost Sensors for Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide

Citation:

Duvall, R., R. Long, M. Beaver, K. Kronmillwe, M. Wheeler, Jim Szykman, M. Silverman, AND J. Crawford. Performance Evaluation and Community Application of Low-Cost Sensors for Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide. Sensors. MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 16(10):1698, (2016).

Impact/Purpose:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD’s research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA’s strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize the movement of pollutants from the source to contact with humans. Our multidisciplinary research program produces Methods, Measurements, and Models to identify relationships between and characterize processes that link source emissions, environmental concentrations, human exposures, and target-tissue dose. The impact of these tools is improved regulatory programs and policies for EPA.

Description:

This study reports on the performance of electrochemical-based low-cost sensors and their use in a community application. CairClip sensors were collocated with federal reference and equivalent methods and operated in a network of sites by citizen scientists (community members) in Houston, Texas and Denver, Colorado, under the umbrella of the NASA-led DISCOVER-AQ Earth Venture Mission. Measurements were focused on ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The performance evaluation showed that the CairClip O3/NO2 sensor provided a consistent measurement response to that of reference monitors (r2 = 0.79 in Houston; r2 = 0.72 in Denver) whereas the CairClip NO2 sensor measurements showed no agreement to reference measurements. The CairClip O3/NO2 sensor data from the citizen science sites compared favorably to measurements at nearby reference monitoring sites. This study provides important information on data quality from low-cost sensor technologies and is one of few studies that reports sensor data collected directly by citizen scientists.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/16/10/1698   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 10/13/2016
Record Last Revised: 12/06/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 333390

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN EXPOSURE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DIVISION

PROCESS MODELING RESEARCH BRANCH