Science Inventory

Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

Citation:

Shin, H., Paul-A Jones, R. Brook, R. Bard, K. Oliver, AND R. Williams. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation. 2015 ISEE, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL, August 30 - September 03, 2015.

Impact/Purpose:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize the movement of pollutants from the source to contact with humans. Our multidisciplinary research program produces Methods, Measurements, and Models to identify relationships between and characterize processes that link source emissions, environmental concentrations, human exposures, and target-tissue dose. The impact of these tools is improved regulatory programs and policies for EPA.

Description:

Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007. Through all participants’ wearing of a monitoring vest, personal exposures to various air pollutants were measured.Objectives: The study objective was to identify the association between personal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and six cardiovascular health endpoints in the DEARS.Methods: Twenty five VOCs were collected using the DEARS exposure vest. Six cardiovascular health endpoints including systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), brachial artery diameter (BAD), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and nitroglycerin-mediated arterial dilatation (NMD) were collected. To reduce the number of personal VOCs highly correlated to each other, a principal component analysis was conducted. Accounting for more individual variations in association between personal VOCs and cardiovascular health endpoints, a linear mixed model was employed.Results: Applying the principal component analysis, 3 out of 12 components were retained, which appeared to involve a petroleum source (1st component), a 1-3 butadiene source (2nd component), and an ambient (Freon) source (3rd component). Petroleum related VOCs were associated with increases in FMD and showed mixed relationships with NMD (lag 0-1 day increased NMD, lag 2 days decreased NMD). Butadiene related VOCs decreased DBP but increased HR and BAD. Freon (ambient background) related VOCs increased HR.Conclusions: We observed mixed and variable results in this first study to evaluate the relationships between personal exposures to VOCs of different origin on cardiovascular physiology. In sum, the findings suggest that VOCs may have rapid impacts upon the human cardiovascular system.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.isee2015.org/programacao/index.php   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 09/03/2015
Record Last Revised: 04/15/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 311893

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN EXPOSURE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DIVISION

EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS & ANALYSIS BRANCH