Science Inventory

Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

Citation:

Chen, C. AND R. Zepp. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water. Presented at Gordon Research Conference, Environmental Sciences: Water, Holderness, NH, June 21 - 27, 2014.

Impact/Purpose:

Presented at the Gordon Research Conference, Environmental Sciences: Water

Description:

Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may play a part in their toxicity to cells in both medical andenvironmental contexts. Also, large variations during manufacturing, synthesis methods, and exposed conditions of ENMs should be considered when evaluating environmental fate,effects, and associated risks. This study focused on ROS interactions with carbonnanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Under sunlight exposure, thephotoreactivity of various carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes(SWCNT-COOHs) was investigated, and the production rate of one important ROS,singlet oxygen, reflected their carboxyl content. It indicated that higher carboxylcontent and better dispersion in water enhance production of CNT triplet states that are known to sensitize singlet oxygen production. These results reveal potential influence of the intrinisic properties and/or surface chemistry of SWCNT-COOHs on theirsubsequent phototransformation in aquatic systems.

URLs/Downloads:

https://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=11254   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 06/27/2014
Record Last Revised: 08/12/2015
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 308834

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

ECOSYSTEMS RESEARCH DIVISION