Science Inventory

EXHALED HUMAN BREATH MEASUREMENT OF JET FUEL CONSTITUENTS: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN INHALATION AND DERMAL EXPOSURE ROUTES

Citation:

PLEIL, J. D., P. P. EGEGHY, E. CHAO, L. NYLANDER-FRENCH, AND S. M. RAPPAPORT. EXHALED HUMAN BREATH MEASUREMENT OF JET FUEL CONSTITUENTS: DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN INHALATION AND DERMAL EXPOSURE ROUTES. Presented at Breathing Analysis for Medical Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring, Innsbruck, AUSTRIA, May 26 - 28, 2005.

Impact/Purpose:

The objective of this task is to develop state-of-the-art methods for measuring xenobiotic compounds, to include the isolation of the analyte from the appropriate matrix (extraction), preconcentration (typically sorbent-based), and analysis via GC/MS and/or LC/MS. Once established, these methods will be applied in small scale pilot studies or demonstration projects. Particular emphasis will be placed on methods which are readily transferable to other laboratories, including those within the Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD), the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL), other EPA Laboratories, Program Offices, Regions, and academic institutions.

Specific objectives of this task include the following:

1) Development of GC/MS and LC/MS methods for the measurement of key xenobiotic compounds and their metabolites (to include the pyrethroid pesticides, perfluorinated organic compounds, and the BFRs) in relevant environmental and biological matrices.

2) Development of efficient low cost methods for the extraction and clean up of these compounds collected from relevant matrices.

3) Determination of xenobiotic compound and metabolite concentrations in samples derived from laboratory and field monitoring studies to help assess exposures and evaluate associated risks.

Description:

In response to anecdotal reports, perceived health issues, and widespread complaints, the U.S. military launched an investigation into the occupational and environmental human exposure to jet fuel. The work described in the presentation assesses the correlation between two breath measurement methods and interprets these results to predict the relative contribution from the inhalation and the dermal exposure pathways. We subsequently correlate these predictions with objective measures of dermal-only exposure as assessed via a skin tape stripping method. As such, we demonstrate the range of total jet fuel exposure for Air Force personnel, the dermal-only exposures, and also the utility of breath measurements to estimate the relative contribution of the dermal and inhalation exposure routes.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 05/27/2005
Record Last Revised: 06/21/2006
Record ID: 131003

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN EXPOSURE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DIVISION

METHODS DEVELOPMENT & APPLICATION BRANCH