Science Inventory

The role of soil and house dust physicochemical properties in determining the post ingestion bioaccessibility of sorbed polychlorinated biphenyls

Citation:

Shen, H., W. Li, S. Graham, AND J. Starr. The role of soil and house dust physicochemical properties in determining the post ingestion bioaccessibility of sorbed polychlorinated biphenyls. CHEMOSPHERE. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 217:1-8, (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.10.195

Impact/Purpose:

Ingestion of soils and house dusts with sorbed toxicants is an important pathway for children’s exposure to many regulated organic chemicals. Therefore, it is important to understand the extent to which soil/dust sorbed toxicants mobilize (become bioaccessible) in the digestive tract. Results for an in vitro, three-compartment system to model the bioaccessibility of the insecticide fipronil and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from 37 soil and 37 house dust samples are reported.

Description:

Ingestion of soils and house dusts is an important pathway for children's exposure to sorbed organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To reduce the uncertainty of the exposure estimates, it is important to understand the extent to which chemicals desorb and become bioaccessible following ingestion. In this study we use a three compartment in vitro digestive system to model the role of soil and house dust physicochemical properties on the post ingestion bioaccessibility of PCBs. Matched pairs (n = 37) of soil and dust were characterized for percent carbon and nitrogen, pH, moisture content, and particle size distribution. They were then fortified with a mixture of 18 PCBs and processed through the assay. The percent bioaccessibility of each PCB was calculated, then modeled using individual PCB log Kow values and the soil and dust properties. The bioaccessibility of the PCBs in soil (x̄ = 65 ± 16%) was greater (p < 0.001) than that of the PCBs in house dust (x̄ = 36 ± 14%). In the soil model, carbon was the sole statistically significant predictive (p ≤ 0.05) variable, while in house dust, both carbon and clay content were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) predictors.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.10.195   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 02/01/2019
Record Last Revised: 12/21/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 343707

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

EXPOSURE METHODS & MEASUREMENT DIVISION