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Main Title Sustainability appraisal : a sourcebook and reference guide to international experience /
Author Dalal-Clayton, D. B.
Publisher Routledge,
Year Published 2014
OCLC Number 853664412
ISBN 9781844073573; 1844073572; 9780415696166; 041569616X; 0203135237; 9780203135235; 113648390X; 9781136483905
Subjects Sustainable development--International cooperation. ; Rural development--International cooperation. ; Environmental policy--International cooperation. ; Nachhaltigkeit.--(DE-588)4326464-5 ; Umweltpolitik.--(DE-588)4078523-3
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ELBM  HC79.E5D3189 2014 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 09/16/2016
Collation xlii, 810 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages 719-790) and index.
Contents Notes Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Introduction and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Brief definition and unpacking of terms -- 1.1.1. Sustainability appraisal as a policy instrument and vector for reform -- 1.2. Emerging demand for integrated sustainability-focused approaches -- 1.3. Purpose, rationale and scope: the what, why and how of the review -- 1.4. An initial framework for sustainability appraisal -- Note -- 2.A macro framework for sustainability appraisal: concepts, principles and perspectives -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Background: evolution of sustainable development in international law and policy -- 2.2.1. Early beginnings -- 2.2.2. Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) -- 2.2.3. The UN Conference on Environment and Development (1992) -- 2.2.4. UN Millennium Development Goals (2000) -- 2.2.5. The UN World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002) -- 2.2.6. Tallying the ledger. Contents note continued: 2.2.7. The latest UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) -- 2.2.8. Sustainable development goals -- 2.3. Towards an operational understanding of sustainable development: perspectives on evaluation -- 2.3.1. The imperative for sustainability and the issue of limits to growth -- 2.3.1.1. Making the case for limits -- 2.3.1.2. Counter-arguments -- 2.3.1.3. The prevailing orthodoxy: managing risks and banking on technology -- 2.3.2. Key components of sustainable development and the conditions for sustainability -- 2.3.2.1. The Brundtland definition of sustainable development -- 2.3.2.2. Capital assets and their inter- and intra-generational transfer -- 2.3.2.3. System conditions for sustainability identified in The Natural Step -- 2.3.3. The governance of sustainable development and institutions for public policy-making -- 2.3.3.1. Themes and issues of sustainability governance -- 2.3.3.2. Multi-level governance -- 2.4. Sustainability as an integrated approach. Contents note continued: 2.4.1. Different forms of integration -- 2.4.2.A closer look at the integration of the three pillars of sustainable development -- 2.5. Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. Integrated approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 3.1.A tri-partite approach to integrated, sustainability-focused decision-making -- 3.1.1. Time and space boundaries -- 3.1.2.A compass of sustainability guides and reference points -- 3.1.3.A systematic process of sustainability assessment -- 3.1.4. Rules of the game for process design and implementation -- 3.1.4.1. The framework of sustainability aims and principles -- 3.1.4.2. Core principles and requirements that will govern the assessment process -- 3.1.4.3. Objectives-led and effects-based sustainability criteria that will direct the assessment of effects -- 3.1.4.4. Trade-offs and decision-making -- 3.2. Micro-level integration (impact assessment). Contents note continued: 3.3. Meso-level integration (strategic) planning and policy mechanisms, with particular reference to sustainable development strategies and scenario planning -- 3.3.1. Sustainable development strategies -- 3.3.2. Scenario planning -- 3.4. Macro-level integration (progress accounting) -- 3.4.1. Ex post or retrospective approaches to measuring and analysing sustainability -- 3.4.1.1. Account-based approaches -- 3.4.1.2. Narrative assessments -- 3.4.1.3. Indicator-based assessments -- 3.4.1.4. An example of retrospective application -- 3.4.1.5. Deciding what to measure: a framework of parts and aims -- 3.5. Methods and tools for integration -- 3.5.1. Examples of tools for undertaking sustainability assessment -- 3.5.1.1. Assessing the sustainability of societal initiatives and proposing agendas for change (ASSIPAC) -- 3.5.1.2. Threshold 21 -- 3.5.1.3. Consistency analysis matrix for policy assessment -- 3.5.1.4. Sustainability test. Contents note continued: 3.5.1.5. Questionnaire-based approaches -- 3.5.1.6. Toolkit approaches -- 3.5.1.7. Adaptive, participatory approaches -- 3.5.1.8. Global sector-wide approaches -- 3.5.1.9. Other approaches -- 3.6. Conclusion -- Notes -- pt. 2 Dimensions of sustainability -- 4. Environmental sustainability appraisal and assurance: concepts, approaches and applications -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Environmental sustainability in a full world: values, concepts and policies -- 4.2.1. Environmentalism and sustainable development: world-views and values of nature in a full world -- 4.2.2. International environmental law and policy -- 4.2.2.1. Status, scope and sustainability relevance of multilateral environmental agreements -- 4.2.2.2. The biodiversity and climate change conventions -- 4.2.2.3. MEA implementation and issues of compliance, enforcement and effectiveness -- 4.2.3. Scientific concepts, criteria and interpretations of environmental sustainability. Contents note continued: 4.2.3.1. Environmental and Earth system science for sustainability -- 4.2.3.2. Conceptual models and propositions of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.3. Frameworks and metrics of global environmental sustainability -- 4.2.3.4. Resilience and vulnerability of natural and socio-ecological systems -- 4.3. Macro-assessment of global and large-scale environmental change -- 4.3.1. Overview of the state of the global environment -- 4.3.2. Major issues and inter-linkages -- 4.3.2.1. Climate change -- 4.3.2.2. Loss of species, biodiversity and ecosystem services -- 4.3.2.3. Emerging risks and issues -- 4.3.3. Sustainability implications of global environmental change -- 4.4. Environmental assessment and management approaches and applications -- 4.4.1. Environmental mainstreaming: need and tools -- 4.4.2. EAM tools and approaches to environmental safeguarding -- 4.4.2.1. Environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment. Contents note continued: 4.4.2.2. Cumulative effects assessment and management (CEAM) -- 4.4.2.3. Environmental risk assessment -- 4.4.2.4. Integrated environmental/ecosystem assessment -- 4.4.2.5. Environmental management regimes and systems -- 4.4.3. Environmental assessment and management tools and approaches for environmental sustainability assurance -- 4.4.3.1. Specifying demand- and supply-side principles for strong sustainability -- 4.4.3.2. Strengthening EIA and SEA and other EAM tools as sustainability instruments -- 4.4.3.3. Ecosystems approach to maintaining critical natural capital and services -- 4.5. Conclusion -- Notes -- 5. Economics-based approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Background: entry points for an economic approach to sustainability analysis -- 5.3. Sustainability -- 5.3.1. The term `sustainability' -- 5.3.2. Economic sustainability in a narrow sense -- 5.3.3. Economic sustainability as a dimension of sustainable development. Contents note continued: 5.3.4. Sustainability as non-declining human welfare -- 5.3.4.1. Natural capital: weak and strong sustainability -- 5.3.4.2. Other types of capital -- 5.4. Economic applications of sustainability assessment -- 5.5. Approaches to integrating economic variables with social and environmental variables -- 5.5.1. Approaches to integration in the estimation of impacts -- 5.5.1.1. Scope of integration -- 5.5.1.2. Methodological approaches and challenges -- 5.5.1.3. Simple methods -- 5.5.1.4.Complex methods -- 5.6. Evaluation and comparison: integration of economic, environmental and social variables -- 5.6.1. Assessment of projects -- 5.6.2. Assessment of policy -- 5.6.3. Macro-economic performance -- 5.6.3.1. Adjusted savings -- 5.6.3.2. Trade and trans-boundary movements of capital -- 5.6.3.3. Addressing the social dimension of sustainable development -- 5.7. Emergence of the green economy concept -- 5.8. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes. Contents note continued: 6. Social dimensions of sustainability appraisal -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2.Organising concepts, values and principles -- 6.2.1. Scope and interpretation of social sustainability -- 6.2.1.1. Basic needs and social well-being -- 6.2.1.2. Equity: basic needs plus what else? -- 6.2.1.3. Social inclusion -- 6.2.1.4. Social capital -- 6.2.1.5. Empowerment -- 6.2.1.6. Security and resilience -- 6.2.2. International law and policy -- 6.2.3. The implementation gap and the role of international agencies -- 6.2.4. National policy frameworks -- 6.3. Retrospective assessments of trends and issues: global and national social appraisals -- 6.4. Status of social appraisal: tools and approaches -- 6.4.1. Social impact assessment (SIA) -- 6.4.1.1. Scope and purpose of SIA -- 6.4.1.2. SIA principles and guidelines -- 6.4.1.3. Steps in SIA -- 6.4.1.4. Methods and data -- 6.4.1.5. Integration with other impact assessments and sustainability concepts -- 6.4.2. Health impact assessment (HIA). Contents note continued: 6.4.2.1. Sustainability values and guiding principles of HIA -- 6.4.2.2. HIA procedure and methodology -- 6.4.2.3. HIA application and good practice -- 6.4.3. Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRLA) -- 6.4.4. Indigenous peoples and cultural assessment -- 6.4.5. Sustainable livelihoods framework -- 6.5. World Bank social appraisal tools -- 6.5.1. Poverty assessments -- 6.5.2. Poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) -- 6.5.3. Gender analysis -- 6.5.4. Indigenous peoples' development planning -- 6.5.5. Resettlement -- 6.6. Public participation in decision-making -- 6.6.1. Types of public participation -- 6.7. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 3 National and international experience to date -- 7. Experience in the European Union and selected developed countries -- 7.1. The European Union and Europe-wide agenda -- 7.1.1. Legal and policy framework -- 7.1.1.1. Sustainable development in EU primary law -- 7.1.1.2. EU sustainable development policy and strategy. Contents note continued: 7.1.2.(Integrated) impact assessment -- 7.1.2.1. Cornerstones and elements of approach -- 7.1.2.2. Initial phase of implementation (2002--2005) -- 7.1.2.3. Recent changes in guidance and oversight (2006--2011) -- 7.1.2.4.A final word on impact assessment as a sustainability tool -- 7.1.3. EC-funded research projects and training on impact assessment -- 7.1.4. The European Environmental Agency -- 7.2. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 7.3. Selected national experiences -- 7.3.1. Australia -- 7.3.1.1. Legal and policy background -- 7.3.1.2. Integrated assessment at the Commonwealth level -- 7.3.1.3. Application at the state level: Western Australia -- 7.3.1.4. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) -- 7.3.2. Canada -- 7.3.2.1. Legal and policy background -- 7.3.2.2. Role and approach of the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy. Contents note continued: 7.3.2.3. Experience with federal sustainable development strategies -- 7.3.2.4. Impact assessment -- 7.3.2.5. Land use and resource planning related approaches -- 7.3.3. The Netherlands -- 7.3.3.1. National-level assessment -- 7.3.3.2. Provincial-level assessment -- 7.3.3.3. Municipal-level assessment -- 7.3.3.4. General framework for SA -- 7.3.4. New Zealand -- 7.3.4.1. Legal and policy background -- 7.3.4.2. RMA practice -- 7.3.5. Switzerland -- 7.3.6. The United Kingdom -- 7.3.6.1. Policy-level appraisal -- 7.3.6.2. Assessment of plans and programmes -- 7.3.6.3. New planning framework in England -- 7.3.7. The USA -- 7.4. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 8. Experience in selected development cooperation agencies and developing countries -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Multilateral agencies -- 8.2.1. The African Development Bank (AfDB) -- 8.2.2. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) -- 8.2.2.1. Country environmental analyses -- 8.2.2.2. Strategic environmental assessment. Contents note continued: 8.2.2.3. Safeguard policy statement -- 8.2.2.4. Sustainability reports -- 8.2.2.5. Environment-cum-economic planning -- 8.2.3. The Inter-American Development Bank -- 8.2.4. The International Finance Corporation and the World Bank -- 8.3. Bilateral agencies -- 8.3.1. Australia: Ausaid -- 8.3.2. Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) -- 8.3.3. The Netherlands -- 8.3.4. The Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) -- 8.3.5. The Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) -- 8.4. UN organisations -- 8.4.1. UNEP -- 8.4.2. UNDP -- 8.4.3. Poverty--Environment Initiative -- 8.5. Developing countries -- 8.5.1. Southern Africa -- 8.5.1.1. Southern African views on sustainable development and approaches to sustainability appraisal -- 8.5.1.2. Rossing uranium mine sustainability assessment, Namibia -- 8.5.2. South Africa -- 8.5.2.1. Introduction -- 8.5.2.2. Government initiatives -- 8.5.2.3. Provincial and local-level initiatives. Contents note continued: 8.5.2.4. Private sector initiatives -- 8.5.2.5. Cape Action Plan for the Environment -- 8.5.2.6. Human settlement policy framework -- 8.5.3. Some examples of experience in other developing countries -- 8.6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- pt. 4 Sustainability appraisal methodologies and their application -- 9. Natural resources and land use -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Background on key concepts and approaches -- 9.2.1. Linking global environmental issues and human needs -- 9.2.2. Land evaluation and land use planning -- 9.2.3. Cross-cutting concepts and approaches -- 9.2.3.1. Analysing the resource wealth of the poor -- 9.3. Global assessment and analysis of natural resource issues and links -- 9.4. Food and water security as fundamental challenges -- 9.4.1. Global food assessment and response planning -- 9.4.2. Global assessments of water trends and issues -- 9.4.3. Regional and trans-boundary assessment. Contents note continued: 9.4.4. National- and sub-national water assessment: an example from the Netherlands -- 9.4.5. Towards hydropower sustainability assessment -- 9.5. Sustainable agriculture -- 9.5.1. Trends and issues -- 9.5.2. Policy responses to the impact of intensive farming -- 9.5.2.1. European approaches to policy reform -- 9.5.2.2. Sustainability assessment of farms -- 9.5.2.3. Inquiry into the sustainability of intensive farming, New Zealand -- 9.5.3. Sustainable agriculture and rural development, standards and certification in developing countries -- 9.6. Sustainable forestry management -- 9.6.1. Global assessments and trends -- 9.6.2. Assessing sustainable forest management -- 9.6.3. Intensive, commercial forestry -- 9.6.3.1. Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) process, Australia -- 9.6.3.2. Tool for sustainability impact assessment of the Forest Wood Chain (ToSIA) -- 9.7. Sustainable fisheries management -- 9.7.1. Issues and trends in fisheries -- 9.7.2. Global assessments. Contents note continued: 9.7.3. Fisheries certification -- 9.7.4. Sustainable fisheries assessment and management -- 9.7.4.1. Sustainable fisheries assessment: Australian practice -- 9.7.5. Aquaculture as a sustainability issue -- 9.7.5.1. Assessments and audits of the impact of salmon farming in British Columbia -- 9.8. Conclusion -- Notes -- 10. Sustainability appraisal for business, industry and infrastructure development -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Key concepts and drivers -- 10.3. Sustainability norms and principles for business and industry -- 10.3.1. Industry member forums -- 10.3.2. Norms and standards aimed at regulation of business and industry -- 10.4. Key tools and approaches -- 10.4.1. Sustainability reporting -- 10.4.2. Triple bottom line assessment -- 10.4.3. Life cycle analysis (LCA) -- 10.4.4. Environmental accounting -- 10.4.5. Environmental or sustainability audit -- 10.4.6. Sustainability-Integrated Guidelines for Management (SIGMA) -- 10.4.7. The Natural Step. Contents note continued: 10.4.8. Sustainable Project Appraisal Routine (SPeAR) -- 10.4.9. Anglo American's Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox (SEAT) -- 10.4.10. Environmental sustainability assessment -- 10.4.11. Corporate sustainability assessment: the case of Crystal Flash, Michigan -- 10.4.12. Bp's Sustainability Assessment Model (SAM) -- 10.4.13. Bank Sarasin: sustainability assessment for investment -- 10.4.14. Dow Jones sustainability indexes and corporate sustainability assessments -- 10.4.15. UK Government: sustainability assessment of renewable energy projects -- 10.4.16. Sustainability assessment for small and medium-sized enterprises -- 10.5. Sectoral review processes -- 10.5.1. The Sustainable Paper Cycle Study -- 10.5.2. The Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) project -- 10.5.3. Extractive Industries Review: a sustainability appraisal by any other name? -- 10.5.3.1. The EIR process: did it satisfy the requirements of a sustainability appraisal? Contents note continued: 10.5.4. World Commission on Dams: performance assessment of large dams -- 10.6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Notes -- 11. Sustainable urban development -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Background: conceptual and policy frameworks -- 11.2.1. Urban growth in the developing and developed worlds -- 11.2.2. Some basic terms and concepts -- 11.2.3. Urban sustainability policies and strategies -- 11.2.3.1. Global policy agenda -- 11.2.3.2. EU strategies and policies -- 11.2.3.3. Development cooperation agency policies -- 11.2.3.4. National and state approaches -- 11.2.3.5. Local Agenda 21's and municipal activities -- 11.3. Global and comparative assessments of sustainability-related urban trends and conditions -- 11.3.1. Global dynamics and impacts of urban expansion -- 11.3.2. Cities as the new frontier in the struggle for sustainability -- 11.3.2.1. Cities in a Globalising World; Global Report on Human Settlements (2001) (UN-Habitat 2001). Contents note continued: 11.3.2.2. The Challenge of Slums; Global Report on Human Settlements (2003) (UN-Habitat 2003a) -- 11.3.2.3. State of the World's Cities Report, 2008--2009: Harmonious Cities (UN-Habitat 2008) -- 11.3.2.4. State of the World's Cities Report, 2010--11: Bridging the Urban Divide (2010) (UN-Habitat 2010) -- 11.3.2.5. State of the World's Cities Report, 2012--2013: Prosperity of Cities (UN-Habitat 2012) -- 11.3.3.Comparative rating of cities -- 11.3.3.1. Global ratings of liveable and hardship cities -- 11.3.3.2. National surveys -- 11.4. Assessing the external impacts of cities -- 11.4.1. Regional and peri-urban effects -- 11.4.1.1. Developing country issues and approaches -- 11.4.1.2. Developed country issues and approaches -- 11.4.2. Urban ecological footprints and resource metabolism -- 11.5. City and municipal-level approaches -- 11.5.1. Providing information, awareness-raising and toolkit approaches -- 11.5.2. Municipal sustainability assessment. Contents note continued: 11.5.3. Approaches focusing on the built environment -- 11.5.3.1. Sustainability appraisal applied to government estates -- 11.5.4. Questionnaire, checklist and matrix approaches -- 11.5.5. Municipal environmental budgeting -- 11.6. Local and community-based planning initiatives to move towards sustainability -- 11.6.1. Citizen-based assessment -- 11.6.2. Campus sustainability assessments -- 11.6.3. Home sustainability assessment -- 11.7. Urban development and climate change -- 11.8. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 12. Trade liberalisation policies and sustainability measures -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Background on the international trade regime with particular reference to environment and sustainable development -- 12.2.1. The multilateral trade regime -- 12.2.2. Regional and bilateral free trade agreements -- 12.3. Current practice in SIA of trade policies -- 12.3.1. International organisations. Contents note continued: 12.3.1.1. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) -- 12.3.1.2. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) -- 12.3.1.3. The Organisation of American States (OAS) -- 12.3.1.4. World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) -- 12.3.2. Other trade-related institutional initiatives -- 12.3.2.1. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) -- 12.3.2.2. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) -- 12.3.2.3. International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) -- 12.3.3. National and supra-national approaches -- 12.3.3.1. The Canadian and US experience -- 12.3.3.2. North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (NACEC) -- 12.3.3.3. The European Commission (EC) -- 12.3.4. Other approaches -- 12.4.Common elements and differences in the major approaches to trade SIA -- 12.4.1. Coverage of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development -- 12.4.2. Coverage of trade measures. Contents note continued: 12.4.3. Geographical coverage -- 12.4.4. Assessment procedures -- 12.4.5. Stakeholder participation and consultation -- 12.4.6. Timing -- 12.4.7. Scenarios -- 12.4.8. Assessment and valuation tools -- 12.4.9. Indicators -- 12.4.10. Significance criteria -- 12.5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- pt. 5 Where to from here? -- 13. Retrospect and prospect -- 13.1. The evolving agenda of sustainable development -- 13.1.1.A reality check: has development become more sustainable in practice? -- 13.1.2.A horizon check: what emerging trends challenge our current approach to sustainable development? -- 13.1.3.A strategy check: where should we now be focusing our energies in the `new era of challenges for sustainable development'? -- 13.2. The anatomy of sustainability appraisal: some concluding observations and second thoughts -- 13.2.1. How far have we progressed with sustainability appraisal? -- 13.2.2. Where do we go from here in process and practice? Contents note continued: 13.2.3. Building on what we have: some ways forward and some unresolved questions -- 13.2.4. Sustainability appraisal framework revisited -- Acknowledgement -- Notes.
Place Published New York
PUB Date Free Form ©2014
BIB Level m
Medium unmediated
Content text
Carrier volume
Cataloging Source RDA
LCCN 2013025673
Merged OCLC records 744528005; 876346489; 880921030
OCLC Time Stamp 20160912052934
Language eng
Origin OCLC
Type CAT
OCLC Rec Leader 24459cam 2200829 i 45010