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RECORD NUMBER: 34 OF 84

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Evaluation of motor vehicle and other combustion emissions using short-term genetic bioassays /
Author Lewtas, Joellen.
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Health Effects Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1983
Report Number PB83-233270; EPA-600/D-83-078
Stock Number PB83-233270
OCLC Number 758886086
Subjects Diesel motor exhaust gas--Toxicology--Congresses. ; Vehicle Emissions--toxicity--Congresses.
Additional Subjects Bioassays ; Exhaust emissions ; Mutagens ; Carcinogens ; Combustion products ; Organic compounds ; Fuels ; Engines ; Air pollution control ; Distillation ; Sources ; Comparison ; Assessments ; Toxicity ; Chemical analysis ; Stationary sources ; Salmonella typhimurium
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100XWWD.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELCD  EPA 600-D-83-078 NVFEL Library/Ann Arbor, MI 07/20/2012
NTIS  PB83-233270 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation ii, 16 : charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Short-term genetic bioassays have been useful in evaluating uregulated organic combustion emissions from motor vehicles. Identification of mutagens and carcinogens in complex exhaust emissions has been greatly facilitated by the use of bioassay-directed fractionation and characterization methods. It has also been possible to evaluate the effect of fuels, engine types, and control technologies on the rates of mutagenic emissions from motor vehicles. Greater differences in the rate of mutagenic emissions have been observed between different engines (e.g., diesel vs. gasoline) and control technologies (e.g., with and without catalyst) than between different fuels. A comparative evaluation of various combustion sources indicates that motor-vehicle emissions make a major contribution to the mutagenicity observed in ambient air.
Notes
"PB83-233270." "EPA-600/D-83-078." "July 1983." Includes bibliographical references (p. 15-16).
Contents Notes
Short-term genetic bioassays have been useful in evaluating unregulated organic combustion emissions from motor vehicles. Identification of mutagens and carcinogens in complex exhaust emissions has been greatly facilitated by the use of bioassay-directed fractionation and characterization methods. It has also been possible to evaluate the effect of fuels, engine types, and control technologies on the rates of mutagenic emissions from motor vehicles. Greater differences in the rate of mutagenic emissions have been observed between different engines (e.g., diesel vs. gasoline) and control technologies (e.g., with and without catalyst) than between different fuels. A comparative evaluation of various combustion sources indicates that motor-vehicle emissions make a major contribution to the mutagenicity observed in ambient air.