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RECORD NUMBER: 11 OF 20

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Modeling Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Concentrations in Narragansett Bay.
Author Abdelrhman, M. A.
CORP Author National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Narragansett, RI. Atlantic Ecology Div.; National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Corvallis, OR.
Year Published 2016
Report Number EPA/600/R-16/195
Stock Number PB2017-100129
Additional Subjects Total Suspended Solids (TSS) ; Modeling & simulation ; Estuarine system ; Concentrations ; Suspended particles ; In-situ measurements ; Environmental conditions assessments ; Narragansett Bay Estuary Program's (NBEP) ; Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100PE3S.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB2017-100129 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/27/2017
Collation 35p
Abstract
This work covers mechanistic modeling of suspended particulates in estuarine systems with an application to Narragansett Bay, RI. Suspended particles directly affect water clarity and attenuate light in the water column (Abdelrhman 2016b). Water clarity affects both phytoplankton and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), which control primary production in estuarine systems. This report is not intended as a comprehensive review of suspended particulates in estuarine systems. The report presents a very brief background about suspended solids which helps interpret their in-situ measurements and understand the logic behind modeling their behavior under various environmental conditions. Assumptions are made to highlight gaps in knowledge and theory and their impact on the presented modeling analysis and results. These assumptions resemble facts that are practiced in the fields of total suspended solids and water clarity. They are standard, usually because of observations and analytical limitations. These assumptions are numbered throughout the text and they are summarized in the conclusion section.