Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 8 OF 52

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Assessment of the ecological impacts of ground water overdraft on wetlands and riparian areas in the United States {Microfiche}
Author Grantham, Cheryl.
CORP Author Idaho Water Resources Research Inst., Moscow.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation.
Publisher Idaho Water Resources Research Center, University of Idaho,
Year Published 1997
Report Number EPA-R-822008-01; EPA/813/S-96/001
Stock Number PB97-192116
Subjects Water withdrawals--Environmental aspects--United States ; Groundwater--United States ; Water table--United States ; Wetlands--United States ; Riparian areas--United States
Additional Subjects Ground water ; Overdraft ; Wetlands ; Riparian land ; Environmental impacts ; Water level fluctuations ; Withdrawal ; Drawdown ; Ground subsidence ; Channel morphology ; Salt water intrusion ; Geochemistry ; Water utilization ; Water allocation(Policy) ; Ecology ; Ecosystems ; Hydrogeology
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=20001V0G.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB97-192116 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation vii, 103 p. : map ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The purpose of this report is to collect and evaluate information on the location, nature, and extent of ecological effects that have been shown to have occurred in wetlands and riparian areas as a result of ground water pumping. Examples include ground water level fluctuation in excess of species; limits of tolerance, reduction of ground water discharge on either a seasonal or long-term basis, and induced recharge of underlying saturated zones derived from drainage of surficial aquifers on which ecosystems are dependent. Overdraft can result in geomorphological changes that impact wetland hydrology such as land subsidence and alteration of river channel morphology and stability. Lastly, changes in the natural geochemical environment in excess of species' tolerance may result from overdraft.
Notes
"May 1996." "Submitted to Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation and Office of Water, United States Environment Protection Agency." Includes bibliographical references (p. 87-103). Microfiche.