Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 311 OF 2702

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Brownfields Insurance for Public Sector-Led Development Projects: Experience and Methods.
Author P. B. Meyer ; K. R. Yount
CORP Author Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights.; Louisville Univ., KY.; Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Year Published 2005
Stock Number PB2010-106813
Additional Subjects Abandoned sites ; Insurance ; State planning ; Local planning ; Data collection ; Industrial sites ; Case studies ; Vignettes ; Procurement processes ; Environmental insurance ; Brownfields Programs ; Property Transfer and Remediation Agreement
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2010-106813 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 09/22/2010
Collation 71p
Abstract
Local governments and their economic development and environmental protection agencies have become ever more active in efforts to remediate and reuse the brownfield sites that are scattered across their communities. As they have come to play a more central role in such regeneration efforts, often acting as the real estate developer for brownfield projects, they have had to deal with other real estate actors and with the broader issues of risk management on their projects. They thus have had to confront a new purchasing decision - the acquisition of environmental insurance. This report builds on the past work on brownfields insurance of Northern Kentucky University and its partner, the University of Louisville. Those earlier efforts examined the supply of insurance coverages, their utility as tools to smooth and facilitate brownfield transactions, state efforts to facilitate private sector access to coverages and impediments to public sector use of the tool. The findings reported here are based primarily on tracking the role of insurance in three public sector-led development efforts over a period of more than two years. Those projects were monitored through personal interviews, attendance at key negotiations and decision-making meetings, and review of documents and agreements between parties to redevelopment deals. Additional data were collected about other local government projects that utilized insurance. While those projects were being monitored, the authors continued to track the environmental insurance industry and collected additional data from brokers and insurance advisors on aspects of the insurance acquisition process. These data, largely involving purely private sector transactions, were analyzed for the guidance they offered to public sector organizations facing an insurance purchase decision. All data collection was conducted with the promise of anonymity to the parties involved. Individuals who provided information are identified in the report only in terms of their roles in projects. Pseudonyms are used to identify cities and organizations.