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RECORD NUMBER: 95 OF 208

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Issue paper 1 : salmonid behavior and water temperature : prepared as part of EPA Region 10 Temperature Water Quality Criteria Guidance Development Project /
Author Sauter, S. T. ; McMillan, J. ; Dunham, J.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Sauter, Sally.
McMillan John.
Dunham, Jason.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10,
Year Published 2001
Report Number EPA-910-D-01-001; EPA-910-0-01-001
Stock Number PB2003-100550
Subjects Water temperature--Northwest, Pacific. ; Pacific salmon. ; Pacific Northwest.
Additional Subjects Water temperature ; Animal behavior ; Salmonids ; Aquatic animals ; Fish ; Behavioral thermoregulation ; Reactive thermoregulation ; Predictive thermoregulation
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100TNSE.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2003-100550 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 38 pages : illustrations, diagrams, graphs ; 28 cm
Abstract
The Salmonid family are cold-blooded organisms that can respond to an uncomfortable water temperature by moving from one spot to another to maintain thermal comfort. If the reason they move is because of a discrepancy between the temperature of the surrounding water and 'set point' in their brains that registers thermal comfort, their response is known as behavioral thermoregulation. In this paper the authors discuss two kinds of behavior thermoregulation: reactive and predictive. The reactive kind is in response to discomfort that is temporary and short term, and so it a response to a proximate factor, as described above. Predictive thermoregulation occurs when the temperature of the water in which salmonids choose to swim reflects their adaptation over time to a changing environment and thus is a response to an ultimate factor, as described above. Sometimes water temperature stimulates behavior that has nothing to do with thermal comfort.
Notes
"May 2001." The Project workgroup consists of individuals from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Region 10), U.S. Forest Service, Washington Department of Ecology, National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Geological Survey, and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Microfiche.
Contents Notes
"The technical workgroup developed five technical summaries on the major physical and biological considerations for developing water temperature standards: 1. thermal effects on salmonid physiology, 2. thermal effects on salmonid behavior, 3. interactions between multiple stressors ... affecting salmonids, 4. thermal influences on salmonid distribution, and 5. spatial and temporal variation in patterns of stream temperature."--Preface.