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RECORD NUMBER: 76 OF 208

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Framework for Developing Hydromodification Monitoring Programs.
Author E. D. Stein ; B. P. Bledsoe
CORP Author Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, El Segundo.; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins.; Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA. Region IX.
Year Published 2013
Report Number EPA/ERA/TR-752
Stock Number PB2013-109528
Additional Subjects Nonpoint sources ; Water pollution control ; Aquatic ecosystems ; Framework ; Assets ; Environmental protection ; Pollution sources ; Streams ; Lakes ; Estuaries ; Aquifers ; Sedimentation ; Natural resources management ; Water temperature ; Dissolved oxygen ; Water quality ; Fish populations ; Hydrocarbons ; Bacteria ; Metals
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2013-109528 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/17/2014
Collation 50p
Abstract
In recognition of the pervasive effects of hydromodification (i.e. alteration of runoff patterns associated with change in land use that result in change in physical channel conditions) on southern California streams, many municipalities are now required to develop hydromodification management programs. Monitoring the effectiveness of these programs is critical because hydromodification management is in its infancy, and there is much to be learned from early efforts. This document is intended to provide a framework to assist state agencies, local jurisdictions, and municipal stormwater permittees in developing detailed hydromodification monitoring plans to address specific management and reporting needs. Monitoring the effects of hydromodification is challenging. Physical changes associated with changes in runoff are difficult to assess because they can result from a combination of contemporary land-use changes, legacy land practices (e.g. grazing), and stochastic events (e.g. floods and fires). Furthermore, channel adjustments can occur dramatically and rapidly after extended periods of apparent stability and can vary over small distances. Separating out the effects of human activity from natural cycles of channel evolution further complicates hydromodification monitoring and requires much longer term monitoring than traditional water quality programs.