Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 275 OF 847

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Effects of Acidic Deposition on Streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont Region of the Mid-Atlantic United States.
Author Herlihy, A. T. ; Kaufmann, P. R. ; Church, M. R. ; Wigington, P. J. ; Webb, J. R. ;
CORP Author Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR. ;Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife. ;Virginia Univ., Charlottesville. Dept. of Environmental Sciences. ;Oak Ridge National Lab., TN.
Publisher c1993
Year Published 1993
Report Number EPA/600/J-93/475;
Stock Number PB94-117561
Additional Subjects Streams ; Water chemistry ; Acidity ; Acid rain ; Aquatic ecosystems ; Fresh water biology ; Toxicity ; Sulfur ; Water pollution effects ; Acid neutralizing capacity ; Chemical properties ; Physical properties ; Regional analysis ; Reprints ; Mid-Atlantic Region(United States) ; Acid episodes
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB94-117561 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 02/27/1994
Collation 18p
Abstract
Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the United States. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small, upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Geophysical Union.)