Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 48 OF 110

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Design and construction of a mobile activated carbon regenerator system
Author Hiltz, R. H.
CORP Author MSA Research Corp., Evans City, PA.;Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1986
Report Number EPA/600/2-86/015; MSAR-81-107; EPA-68-03-2110; PB86156486
Stock Number PB86-156486
OCLC Number 15986596
Subjects Water--Pollution ; Water--Purification--Adsorption ; Carbon, Activated
Additional Subjects Activated carbon ; Water pollution control ; Hazardous materials ; Regenerator ; Portable equipment ; Adsorption ; Solid waste disposal ; Design ; Performance evaluation ; Reclaimation ; Waste treatment ; Waste recycling ; Hazardous materials spills ; Cleanup ; Granular activated carbon treatment
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=91008FBJ.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 600/2-86-015 HWTIC Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 12/24/1992 DISPERSAL
NTIS  PB86-156486 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation 54 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Activated carbon adsorption has become a standard procedure for the cleanup of contaminated water streams. To facilitate such cleanup at hazardous waste and spill sites, mobile carbon adsorption units have been constructed and are now in use. Their primary drawback is the logistics associated with the disposal of spent (contaminated) carbon and its replenishment with fresh, active carbon. The program was undertaken to assess the feasibility of designing and building a mobile carbon regeneration unit - including an incinerator/scrubber to destroy the offgases - for field use in conjunction with mobile carbon adsorption systems. A system was designed and built based on technology developed in the earlier fabrication of a laboratory-sized regenerator and on an in-depth evaluation of factors affecting system design and size. Housed in a standard van-type of trailer, the system met all weight and size limitations for over-the-road transportation. The system includes a direct fired, rotating barrel kiln to thermally regenerate the carbon, an incinerator and scrubber to destroy the desorbed materials and treat the off-gases, and a separator to reclaim the reactivated carbon granules. Test runs using spent carbon from an on-site treatment of a spill were quite successful. The carbon was returned to essentially 1005 activity with an 88% volume recovery. The unit has been delivered to the US EPA for their use.
Notes
"Final 8/6/74-2/8/79" "January 1986"