Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 7 OF 17

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Central shortgrass prairie ecoregional assessment and partnership initiative : final report.
Publisher Colorado State University, Colorado Natural Heritage Program,
Year Published 2006
OCLC Number 207097300
Subjects Prairie ecology--Great Plains. ; Prairies--Great Plains. ; Plant communities--Great Plains. ; Vegetation surveys--Great Plains. ; Grassland ecology--Great Plains. ; Ecosystem management--Great Plains. ; Endemic plants--Great Plains.
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EOAM  QH87.7.C6 2006 CD-ROM Region 8 Technical Library/Denver,CO 08/26/2013
Collation 1 online resource (xix, 124 pages) : illustrations, map
Notes
Online resource; title from PDF cover (viewed October 2016) "November 2006." Includes bibliographical references. "This project was made possible by financial support from the Department of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program, Colorado Division of Wildlife and The Nature Conservancy. Other key participants included Colorado Association of Conservation Districts, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado State Land Board, Comanche National Grassland and Pawnee National Grassland, US Forest Service, Environmental Protection Agency, Directorate of Environmental Compliance and Management, Fort Carson, Natural Resources Conservation Service, NatureServe, Playa Lakes Joint Venture, Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory, and US Fish and Wildlife Service."
Contents Notes
A group of almost two dozen land managers, landowners, state and federal agency representatives, and scientists came together to develop a scientific/technical assessment of the conservation needs for the Central Shortgrass Prairie ecoregion. The Central Shortgrass Prairie ecoregion encompasses approximately 56 million acres and stretches across all of eastern Colorado, portions of southeastern Wyoming, western Kansas and Nebraska, the Panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas, and northeastern New Mexico. The conservation of the Central Shortgrass Prairie ecoregion is important because the temperate grasslands are one of the least protected major habitat types on Earth; less than 5% is protected globally. Temperate grasslands also are among the most highly converted habitats on Earth.