Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 282 OF 1721

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Characterization and treatment of urban land runoff /
Author Colston, Newton V.
CORP Author North Carolina Water Resources Research Inst., Raleigh.;National Environmental Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Publisher National Environmental Research Center, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1974
Report Number EPA-670/2-74-096; EPA-11030-HJP
Stock Number PB-240 987
OCLC Number 01289785
Subjects Runoff--North Carolina--Durham. ; Water--Pollution--North Carolina--Durham. ; Water Pollution--prevention & control. ; Water Supply.
Additional Subjects Water pollution ; Surface water runoff ; Urban areas ; Storms ; Drainage ; Biochemical oxygen demand ; Correlation techniques ; Sewage treatment ; Regression analysis ; Water quality ; Sampling ; North Carolina ; Storm water runoff ; Chemical oxygen demand ; Receiving waters ; Durham(North Carolina) ; Suspended solids
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100TP3Y.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 670/2-74-096 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 08/30/1996
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 670-2-74-096 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 01/05/2015
EJBD  EPA 670-2-74-096 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 05/17/2016
EKAM  TD172.E46 1974 no.96 Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 12/04/1998
ELBD  EPA 670-2-74-096 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 01/02/1998
ERAD  EPA 670/2-74-096 Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 03/18/2013
NTIS  PB-240 987 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation xii, 158 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm.
Abstract
Urban land runoff from a 1.67 square-mile urban watershed in Durham, North Carolina, was characterized with respect to annual pollutant yield. Regression equations were developed to relate pollutant strength to hydrograph characteristics. Urban land runoff was found to be a significant source of pollution when compared to the raw municipal waste generated within the study area. On an annual basis, the urban yield of COD was equal to 91% of the raw sewage yield, the BOD yield was equal to 67%, and the urban runoff suspended solids yield was 20 times that contained in raw municipal wastes for the same area. Downstream water quality was judged to be controlled by urban land runoff 20% of the time. In urban drainage basins, investments in upgrading secondary municipal waste treatment plants without concomitant steps to moderate the adverse effects of urban land runoff are questionable in view of the apparent relative impact of urban land runoff on receiving water quality.
Notes
Prepared for National Environmental Research Center, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under project 11030 HJP, program element 1BB034. "December 1974." Includes bibliographical references (page 117).
Contents Notes
"Urban land runoff from a 1.67 square-mile urban watershed in Durham, North Carolina, was characterized with respect to annual pollutant yield. Regression equations were developed to relate pollutant strength yield. Regression equations were developed to relate pollutant strength to hydrograph characteristics. Urban land runoff was found to be a significant source of pollution when compared to the raw municipal waste generated within the study area. On an annual basis, the urban runoff yield of COD was equal to 91 percent of the raw sewage yield, the BOD yield was equal to 67 percent, and the urban runoff suspended solids yield was 20 times that contained in raw municipal wastes for the same area. Downstream water quality was judged to be controlled by urban land runoff 20 percent of the time (i.e., the pounds of COD from urban land runoff was approximately 4-1/2 times the pounds of COD from raw sewage.) It is conceivable that critical water quality conditions are not typified by the 10-year, 7-day flow, but by the period immediately following low-flow periods when rainfall removes accumulated urban filth into the receiving watercourse, greatly increasing the pollutant load while not substantially increasing water quantity. Specific urban land use did not appear to influence the quality of urban land runoff. The applicability and effectiveness of plain sedimentation and chemical coagulation of urban land runoff was evaluated. Plain sedimentation was found to remove an average of 60 percent of the COD, 77 percent of the suspended solids, and 53 percent of the turbidity. Cationic polyelectrolytes and inorganic coagulants were found to provide significant residual removal increases over plain sedimentation. Alum was judged the best coagulant and produced average removals of COD, suspended solids, and turbidity of 84, 97, and 94 percent, respectively. The EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was evaluated with respect to actual conditions as measured in the field. The model was judged to predict peak hydrograph flows and total hydrograph volumes with reasonable accuracy; however, it was not judged effective for predicting pollutant concentrations. In urban drainage basins, investments in upgrading secondary municipal waste treatment plants without concomitant steps to moderate the adverse effects of urban land runoff are questionable in view of the apparent relative impact of urban land runoff on receiving water quality. This report was submitted in fulfillment of project number 11030 HJP by the North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute under partial sponsorship of the Office of Research and Development, Environmental Protection Agfency. Work was completed as of September 1, 1973"--Page iv. Conclusions -- Recommendations -- Introduction. Project scope and objectives -- Basin description and land use -- Sampling. Hydrologic data ; Automatic sampler -- Characterization of urban land runoff. Hydrologic information ; Individual storm characterization ; Base flow characterization ; Effect of land use on water quality ; BOD difficulties ; COD exertion rate studies ; Representative sampling ; Pollutant regression equations ; Annual pollutant yield ; Summary -- Chemical-physical treatment studies. Introduction ; Jar test procedure ; Coagulants evaluated ; Coagulant evaluation ; Coagulant aid evaluation ; Coagulant selection ; Batch scale coagulant evaluation ; Slude characterization ; Summary -- Relative impact of urban land runoff. Introduction ; Comparison with domestic waste ; Relative impact on downstream oxygen content ; Study area characteristics ; Problem formulation ; Interpretation of results ; Summary -- Factors influencing stormwater treatment economics. Introduction ; Collection ; Treatment ; Sludge disposal ; Summary -- Evaluation of EPA storm water management model. Introduction ; The SWMM model ; Program blocks ; General data requirements ; Application to Third Fork Creek drainage basin ; SWMM verification ; Evaluation of predicted quantities of runoff ; Evaluation of predicted quality of runoff -- References -- Glossary -- Appendix. Time parameters and analytical results of urban runoff events number 1 through 36 ; Third Fork Creek base flow observations at USGS gage house and sub-basins ; Time parameters and analytical results of urban runoff events monitored at sub-basin discharge locations.