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RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 8

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Incorporating Feedback in Travel Forecasting: Methods, Pitfalls, and Common Concerns.
CORP Author COMSIS Corp., Silver Spring, MD.;Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC. Office of Environment and Planning.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.;Department of Energy, Washington, DC.
Publisher Mar 96
Year Published 1996
Report Number DOT-T-96-14;
Stock Number PB97-163570
Additional Subjects Transportation planning ; Trip forecasting ; Feedback ; Research projects ; Forecasting ; Modal choice ; Traffic generation ; Trip purpose ; Urban areas ; Travel time ; Travel costs ;
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB97-163570 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 09/08/1997
Collation 129p
Abstract
The most common method for producing regional or metropolitan area travel forecasts in the United States is to apply the following four modeling steps sequentially: trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice, and route assignment. This traditional four-step process passes output from one step to the next as input. While the process had produced forecast results sufficiently accurate for many types of long-range transportation planning, it is commonly found that some of the outputs of the process are not consistent with inputs to earlier steps. The research undertaken in this project focused on methods to ensure that link speeds used in each step of the travel forecasting process are consistent with the final speeds estimated in the final step of the process. A variety of methods for introducing 'feedback' into the process (reintroducing output of one step as input to a previous step) were explored and guidance was developed on when and how to incorporate feedback into the four-step modeling process. Four possible ways in which feedback can be provided in the four-step process and one additional way that feedback can be accomplished to the forecasting of land-use and activity patterns is illustrated.