Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 36 OF 157

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title EMPACT Beaches Project: Results from a Study on Microbiological Monitoring in Recreational Waters.
Author Wymer, L. J. ; Brenner, K. P. ; Martinson, J. W. ; Stutts, W. R. ; Schaub, S. A. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. National Exposure Research Lab.
Publisher Aug 2005
Year Published 2005
Report Number EPA/600/R-04/023;
Stock Number PB2005-109975
Additional Subjects Environmental monitoring ; Beaches ; Microbiology ; Bacteria ; Coliforms ; Feces ; Water pollution effects ; Guidelines ; Outdoor recreation ; Health effects ; Sampling ; Access ; Communities ; Public health ; Water quality ; Contamination ; Indicators ; United States ; Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking(EMPACT)
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2005-109975 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 07/12/2006
Collation 88p
Abstract
Protecting the health of swimmers who use surface waters for recreation has been of interest to public health officials in the United States since 1930. It was well recognized at that early date that human excreta discharged to surface waters posed a health hazard to those who used the water for recreation. Although the relationship between swimming-associated health effects and feces-contaminated water used for swimming had not been defined, microbial limits based on coliform bacteria were used in many states, particularly when there was physical evidence of sewage contamination. The limiting values selected by responsible authorities were based more on attainment rather than on risk of illness. Thus, there was little uniformity among states regarding what level of coliforms constitute waters safe for swimming. Several states chose 1,000 coliforms per 100 ml as a measure of good quality water, but there was not much uniformity among states regarding what level of coliforms was a safe level. There was, however, a general understanding that fecal contamination of surface water posed a risk to those exposed to the water, and that the risk might be limited by setting a level of fecal contamination above which exposure would be unacceptable. The manner in which water samples were taken, the frequency of sampling, and the number of samples were usually not described in the early literature.