Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 28 OF 157

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Development of an Adjustable Buoyancy Balloon Tracer of Atmospheric Motion. Phase 2. Development of an Operational Prototype.
Author Zak, B. D. ; Church, H. W. ; Lichfield, E. W. ; Ivey, M. D. ;
CORP Author Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM. ;Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM. ;Telemetrics Southwest, Albuquerque, NM.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Sciences Research Lab.
Year Published 1985
Report Number EPA/600/3-86/050;
Stock Number PB87-100525
Additional Subjects Meteorological balloons ; Atmospheric motion ; Air pollution ; Buoyancy ; Design criteria ; Atmospheric disturbances ; Prototypes ; Tracking(Position) ; Cloud cover ; Diagrams ; Drawings ; Tracers
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000X4AX.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB87-100525 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 138p
Abstract
The prototype is a research tool which allows one to follow horizontal and vertical atmospheric flows, including the weak sustained vertical motion of meso- and synoptic-scale atmospheric disturbances. The design goals for the Tracer Balloon being developed here specify a lifetime greater than or equal to 3 days, tracking range greater than or equal to 1000 km, a ceiling altitude greater than or equal to 5.5 km (500 mb), and the capability to respond to mean vertical flows as low as 1 cm/s. The Tracer Balloon is also to measure and telemeter selected meteorological variables, to be sufficiently inexpensive to permit use in significant numbers, and to be serviced by a ground system capable of handling several Tracers at a time. The immediate need for the effort is to evaluate the accuracies of air pollution transport models, to establish source-receptor relationships out to 1000 km, and to assess the limits on the predictability of source impacts at long distances.