Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 28 OF 96

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Effect of ambient temperature and driving cycle on exhaust emissions /
Author Marshall, W. F.
CORP Author Department of Energy, Bartlesville, OK. Bartlesville Energy Technology Center.;Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, MI. Test and Evaluation Branch.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Emission Control Technology Division, Test and Evaluation Branch,
Year Published 1981
Report Number EPA-460/3-80-012
Stock Number PB81-155517
OCLC Number 07557567
Subjects Automobiles--Motors--Exhaust gas.
Additional Subjects Automobiles ; Exhaust emissions ; Fuel consumption ; Air pollution control equipment ; Air conditioners ; Performance evaluation ; Test equipment ; Test facilities ;
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100WW35.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ELCD  EPA 460-3-80-012 NVFEL Library/Ann Arbor, MI 11/06/1998
NTIS  PB81-155517 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 07/22/2019
Collation vii, 65 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
Data on exhaust emissions were obtained from two vehicle fleets (1970 and 1979 model-year) operating over a range of ambient temperatures. The work is providing a baseline against which current-production vehicles can be compared, thus enabling a more complete assessment of automotive emissions reduction achievements. The baseline fleet represented the 1970 MY nationwide mix. The 37 cars were tested at 25, 75, and 100 F over the urban Federal Test Procedure, Highway Fuel Economy Test, and New York City Cycle. Both temperature and driving cycle were found to have significant effects on exhaust emissions. The conditions which yielded the greatest adverse effects on emissions were (1) low temperature--urban driving cycle, and (2) high temperature--New York City driving cycle. The data also indicate that the use of air conditioners causes increased emission levels. These results apply directionally to both fleets. However, the influences of temperature and driving cycle on emission rates of the current model-year fleet were significantly less than on those of the baseline fleet.
Notes
"EPA-460/3-80-012." "June 1980." Includes bibliographical references (page 5). Microfiche: Springfield, Va. : National Technical Information Service, 1981. -- 1 fiche ; 11 x 15 cm. --(PB81-155517).