Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 6 OF 15

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Fundamental study of sulfate aerosol formation, condensation, and growth {MICROFICHE}
Author Yung, S. C. ; Rangaraj, C. N. ; Hancock, B. L. ; Ugale, D. ; Calvert, S.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Yung, S.
CORP Author Air Pollution Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA.;Industrial Environmental Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA-68-02-3650; EPA-600/7-84-049
Stock Number PB84-179886
OCLC Number 48205198
Subjects Sulphates--Environmental aspects--United States ; Aerosols--Environmental aspects--United States ; Air--Pollution--United States
Additional Subjects Air pollution control ; Sulfates ; Aerosols ; Chimneys ; Plumes ; Industrial wastes ; Sampling ; Chemical equilibrium ; Reaction kinetics ; Condensation nuclei ; Chemical reactions ; Combustion products ; Sulfur dioxide ; Sulfur trioxide ; Flue gases ; Computer programs ; Nucleation ; Particle size ; Comparison ; Laboratory equipment ; Chemical reaction mechanisms ; Numerical solution
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB84-179886 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 187 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
The report gives results of a study of the formation and growth of sulfate particles. Existing theoretical models on acid particle formation and growth were reviewed and evaluated. The formation and growth of sulfate particles during slow cooling, rapid cooling, and dilution cooling of flue gas were experimentally determined and compared with theories. The experimental results show that the temperature at which the self-nucleation of sulfuric acid occurs is lower than the acid dew point temperature. Thus, if the flue gas is slowly cooled to between dew point and nucleation temperatures, it is possible to force the sulfuric acid to condense out on surfaces, rather than form fine particles. The theories, experimental methods, and results are described.
Notes
Caption title. Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche. "Mar 1984." "EPA-600/7-84-049." Microfiche.