Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 48 OF 78

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Stratification of Particulate and VOC Pollutants in Paint Spray Booths, June 1990.
Author Darvin, C. H. ; Ayer., J. ;
CORP Author Acurex Corp., Mountain View, CA.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Publisher 1990
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA-68-02-4285; EPA/600/D-90/054;
Stock Number PB90-246240
Additional Subjects Air pollution control ; Spray painting ; Particles ; Stratification ; Flow control ; Air flow ; Flow distribution ; Concentration(Composition) ; Reprints ; Volatile organic compounds ; Indoor air pollution
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB90-246240 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 12/03/1990
Collation 14p
Abstract
The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. The goal of the program is to identify and develop efficient and economical emissions control concepts for this source. Flow management is one potential solution that reduces the volume of gases that must be processed in a control system. Although it will not itself control pollution, it can influence the economic and technical viability of subsequent control systems. The test program discussed here was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control and flow management strategies are being developed. Study results indicate that both particulate and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) fall to the lower level of the booth or, at most, stratify at the level at which they were generated. Results indicate that the concentration at the lower level of the booth near the exhaust was from 5 to 25 times greater than that at the upper level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The enriched lower zone could then be directed to a proportionately smaller VOC control system, of lower capital and operating costs.