Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 18 OF 18

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Use of Kriging to Estimate Monthly Ozone Exposure Parameters for the Southeastern United States (Journal Version).
Author Lefohn, A. S. ; Knudsen, H. P. ; McEvoy, L. R. ;
CORP Author A.S.L. and Associates, Helena, MT. ;Montana Coll. of Mineral Science and Technology, Butte.;Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Publisher c1988
Year Published 1988
Report Number EPA/600/J-88/249;
Stock Number PB89-145007
Additional Subjects Ozone ; Farm crops ; Feasibility studies ; Concentration(Composition) ; Exposure ; Vegetation ; Sites ; Forests ; Graphs(Charts) ; Reprints ; Southeastern Region(United States) ; Air pollution sampling ; Air pollution effects(Plants) ; Kriging
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB89-145007 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/08/1989
Collation 11p
Abstract
The paper explores the feasibility of (1) using kriging to predict the monthly mean of daily 7-h mean (0900-1559) O3 concentrations, (2) using kriging to estimate the percent of hourly mean O3 concentrations equal to or greater than 0.07 ppm (137 microg/cu m) for a specific month, and (3) developing a quantitative relationship between the monthly mean of the daily 7-h (0900-1559) average O3 concentration and the monthly number of hourly concentrations greater than or = 0.08 ppm (157 microg/cu m). The large uncertainties will make it difficult to accurately estimate vegetation effects caused by ambient levels of O3. However, if a generalized quantitative relationship between repeated occurrences of hourly mean concentrations greater than or = 0.07 or greater than or = 0.08 ppm and vegetation effects can be developed, it may be possible using kriged monthly values accompanied with confidence intervals, to identify those areas where vegetation may be at risk. However, before it will be possible to implement such an approach, researchers will have to better quantify the relationship between realistic O3 exposures and vegetation effects. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Applied Science Publishers Ltd.)