Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 578 OF 4311

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Effects of organic solvents on the permeability of clay soils /
Author Brown, Kenneth Warren, ; Anderson, D. C.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Anderson, D. C.
Landreth, Robert C.
CORP Author Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station.;Municipal Environmental Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1983
Report Number EPA/600/2-83/016; EPA-R-806825
Stock Number PB83-179978
Subjects Sanitary landfills. ; Clay--Moisture. ; Permeability.
Additional Subjects Organic solvents ; Earth fills ; Linings ; Clay soils ; Permeability ; Hazardous materials ; Water ; Performance evaluation ; Leaching ; Land disposal ; Liquid wastes ; State of the art
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB83-179978 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 166 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
Traditionally, water has been used as the fluid with which to measure permeability of compacted clay soils to assess their suitability for lining hazardous waste landfill and surface impoundments. To determine if permeability of the liner is sufficiently characterized by its being tested with water alone, permeability studies were conducted using both water and a spectrum of organic fluids commonly placed in hazardous waste disposal facilities. Four clay soils, including kaolinitic, illitic, and smectitic clay soils, were evaluated. Results of this study indicate a need to test the permeability of clay liners with whatever organic fluids the liner may be exposed.
Notes
"March 1983." Includes bibliographical references (pages 95-106). Final report. "Robert C. Landreth, project officer." Microfiche.
Contents Notes
"To determine if permeability of the liner is sufficiently characterized by its being tested with water alone, permeability studies were conducted using both water and a spectrum of organic fluids commonly placed in hazardous waste disposal facilities."