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RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 174

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Accumulation of Poly-beta-Hydroxybutyrate in a Methane-Enriched, Halogenated Hydrocarbon-Degrading Soil Column: Implications for Microbial Community Structure and Nutritional Status.
Author Nichols, P. D. ; White, D. C. ;
CORP Author Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Hobart (Australia). Div. of Oceanography. ;Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. Inst. for Applied Microbiology.;Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.
Publisher c1989
Year Published 1989
Report Number EPA-R-813725; EPA/600/J-89/256;
Stock Number PB90-135260
Additional Subjects Toxicology ; Soil microbiology ; Fatty acids ; Gas chromatography ; Aquifers ; Biomass ; Sodium oxides ; Mass spectroscopy ; Reprints ; Archaebacteria ; Poly-B-hydroxybutyrate ; Soil pollutants ; Pharmacokinetics ; Biotransformation ; Environmental monitoring ; Nutritional status
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB90-135260 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/15/1990
Collation 11p
Abstract
The prokarotic, endogenous storage polymer poly-B-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulated in soil from a methane-enriched, halogenated hydrocarbon-degrading soil column. Two strains analyzed of the type II methanotroph Methylobacterium organophilum were found to contain PHB, with PHB/PLFA ratios similar to those determined for the methane-enriched soil column, suggesting that methanotrophic bacteria enriched in the methane-amended column produced PHB. Control soil and sodium azide-inhibited material, in which methanotroph markers were below detection, did not contain PHB. Biochemical assays, based on the differences observed, can be used to monitor shifts in microbial biomass, community structure and nutritional status of systems used to model microbial biotransformation processes. The study illustrates that biochemical procedures have the potential to monitor the stimulated populations of a native soil microbial community capable of degrading pollutants. (Copyright (c) 1989 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)