Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 1928 OF 2071

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Urban Air Shed Photochemical Simulation Model Study. Volume I. Development and Evaluation. Appendix C. Microscale Model of Local Vehicular Source Contributions to Measured Pollutant Concentrations.
Author Lui, Mei-Kao ; Roth., P. M. ;
CORP Author Systems Applications, Inc., Beverly Hills, Calif.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Office of Research and Development.
Year Published 1973
Report Number EPA-68-02-0339; EPA-R4-73-030d;
Stock Number PB-234 976
Additional Subjects Atmospheric diffusion ; Air pollution ; Carbon monoxide ; Atmospheric models ; Verifying ; Mathematical models ; Buildings ; Exhaust gases ; Urban areas ; Computerized simulation ; Atmospheric motion ; Los Angeles Basin ; Atmospheric circulation ; Performance evaluation ; Streets ; Automobile exhaust
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB-234 976 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 49p
Abstract
To establish a basis for validation of an urban airshed model based on a macroscale grid, a sub-grid, or microscale, model was undertaken capable of predicting the elevation in concentration at the monitoring station, above background levels, that is contributed by local automotive emissions. The development and validation of a simple diffusion model for CO to investigate the feasibility of modeling at two spatial scales is described. Limited results are reported for four LA County stations. Previous efforts in measuring and predicting local variations in concentrations due to nearby sources were reviewed. A general description of the model is given, details of its formulation for application in the vicinity of low structures (one to two story buildings) are discussed and graphs are presented which display the relationship between the magnitude of concentration elevation and the distance of the sampling probe from the street, the speed and direction of the local wind, and the magnitude of the local turbulent eddy diffusivity.