Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 1901 OF 2071

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Two-Dimensional Modeling of Aquifer Remediation Influenced by Sorption Nonequilibrium and Hydraulic Conductivity Heterogeneity.
Author Rabideau, A. J. ; Miller, C. T. ;
CORP Author State Univ. of New York at Buffalo. Dept. of Civil Engineering. ;North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill. Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering.;Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.
Publisher c1994
Year Published 1994
Report Number EPA-R-818647; EPA/600/J-94/303;
Stock Number PB94-189693
Additional Subjects Computerized simulation ; Aquifers ; Remedial action ; Water pollution control ; Hydraulic conductivity ; Alternatives ; Performance evaluation ; Sorption ; Finite element analysis ; Two-dimensional calculations ; Feasibility studies ; Heterogeneity ; Reprints ; Pump and treat systems ; Cleanup operations
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB94-189693 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 11/11/1994
Collation 15p
Abstract
A computational model was developed to simulate aquifer remediation by pump and treat for a confined, perfectly stratified aquifer. A split-operator finite element numerical technique was utilized to incorporate flow field heterogeneity and nonequilibrium sorption into a two-dimensional, radially symmetric advective-dispersive transport model. Simulations reproduced the tailing behavior commonly observed at remedial sites. Predicted remediation times were observed to increase as the degree of hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity and/or sorption nonequilibrium increased. Dimensional analysis was used to facilitate the general application of simulation results to a range of aquifer/contaminant systems. The effects of sorption nonlinearity, sorption capacity heterogeneity, and intermittent pumping were also analyzed. (Copyright (c) 1994 by the American Geophysical Union.)