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OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Environmental assessment of shop towel usage in the automotive and printing industries /
Author Pullman, W. ; Wolf, M. ; Thomas, R. ; Fitzpatrick, P. ; Craig, P.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Wolf, M.
Thomas, R.
Fitzpatrick, P.
Craig, P.
CORP Author Lockheed Martin Environmental Systems and Technologies, Las Vegas, NV.;National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1997
Report Number EPA/600/R-96/150; EPA-68-C4-0020
Stock Number PB97-133698
Additional Subjects Towels ; Shops(Work areas) ; Utilization ; Environmental impact assessments ; Emissions ; Cleaning ; Decontamination ; Laundries ; Life cycle analysis ; Economic analysis ; Pollution abatement ; Inventories ; Automobile repair shops ; Print shops ; Pollution prevention
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB97-133698 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 91 pages ; 28 cm
Abstract
This assessment identifies the environmental impacts and usage trends of shop towels in the printing and automotive repair industries. The shop towels are used to clean equipment and to wipe up contaminants for a variety of operations. Four types of shop towels were evaluated; woven, nonwoven, paper, and rags. The resource requirements and emissions during the manufacture, usage and disposal of each shop towel were compared, with primary focus on the usage and disposal of shop towels. Woven towels that become contaminated from usage are cleaned at industrial laundries and are a significant contributor to the contaminant loading of liquid discharges from the laundries. The printing industry continues to use woven towels rather than nonwoven and paper towels and may use alterative towel cleaning methods in the future. The automotive repair industry continues to use woven towels, but is slowly converting to nonwoven and paper towels due to their adequate capability and low cost.
Notes
"February 1997." "EPA 600/r-96/150." Microfiche.