Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 21 OF 51

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Nationwide evaluation of combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater discharges : volume 1, executive summary /
Author Sullivan, Richard H. ; Manning, Martin J. ; Heaney, James P. ; Huber, Wayne C. ; Medina, Jr., M. A. ;
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Sullivan, Richard H.
CORP Author American Public Works Association, Chicago, Ill. ;Florida Univ., Gainesville.;Municipal Environmental Research Lab., Cincinnati, Ohio.
Publisher Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ; Available through the National Technical Information Service,
Year Published 1977
Report Number EPA 600/2-77-064a; EPA-68-03-0283
Stock Number PB-273 133
OCLC Number 04295519
Subjects Sewerage--United States. ; Urban runoff--United States. ; Water--Pollution--United States.
Additional Subjects Combined sewers ; Mathematical models ; Sewage treatment ; Water pollution control ; Assessments ; Storm sewers ; Cost analysis ; Overflows ; Surface water runoff ; United States ; Water quality ; Demography ; Biochemical oxygen demand ; Capitalized costs ; Storage ; Economics ; Urban hydrology
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100SPUK.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 600/2-77-064a Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 06/02/2000
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-2-77-064a Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 01/13/2011
EJBD  EPA 600-2-77-064a Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 09/06/2012
EKAM  TD172.E46 600 1977, no.64a Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 10/23/1998
ELBD  EPA 600-2-77-064a AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 12/19/1997
ERAD  EPA 600/2-77-064a Region 9 Library/San Francisco,CA 09/17/2012
ESAD  EPA 600-2-77-064a Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 07/11/2017
NTIS  PB-273 133 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation xi, 95 pages : illustrations, graphs, maps ; 28 cm.
Abstract
A study was conducted by the American Public Works Association and the University of Florida to determine: the cost of abating pollution from combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater, the impact of such pollutional discharges on receiving waters, and the pollution potential of such discharges. The study was based upon the availability of existing data and prediction models. Continuous simulation runs using one year of hourly data were made to determine the attainable level of pollution control with a specified availability of storage volume and treatment rate in five cities: Atlanta, Denver, Minneapolis, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. This procedure was used to derive generalized equations relating pollution control to storage and treatment. These results were combined into a simple optimization model which determined the optimal mix of storage and treatment for any feasible level of control for any city. Then the nationwide assessment is presented. The results indicate annual costs ranging from $297 million for 25 percent pollution control to $5,029 million for 85 percent pollution control. The corresponding initial capital investment ranges from $2,476 million for 25 percent control to $41,900 million for 85 percent control. These costs can be reduced significantly if stormwater pollution control is integrated with best management practices and integrated into a multi-purpose program. The balance of the study analyzed existing published and unpublished information to characterize the pollution potential of urban runoff and to estimate the impact of such runoff on receiving waters. It was found that there appears to be direct connections between many parameters such as BOD and suspended solids with the amount of street refuse. However, some parameters appear to be related to more site specific factors. As a practical matter it was found necessary to relate pollution abatement to BOD and suspended solids, even though there are many other pollutants in large concentrations such as heavy metals and phosphorus. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)
Notes
Submitted by the American Public Works Association under contract no. 68-03-0283. Includes bibliographical references.