Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 25 OF 73

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Greenhouse effect, sea level rise, and barrier islands : case study of Long Beach Island, New Jersey /
Author Titus, James G.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Urban and Economic Development Policy Div.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 2004
Stock Number PB2005-100940
Subjects Coast changes--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Wetlands--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Wetland conservation--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Greenhouse effect, Atmospheric--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Sea level--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Barrier islands--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Coastal zone management--New Jersey--Long Beach Island. ; Shore protection--New Jersey--Long Beach Island.
Additional Subjects Sea level ; Barrier islands ; Greenhouse effect ; Water quality ; Earth atmosphere ; Climate ; Atmospheric physics ; Carbon dioxide ; Global warming ; Case studies ; Sea level rise ; Long Beach Island(New Jersey)
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2005-100940 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 01/01/1988
Collation 1 volume ; 25 cm
Abstract
Increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are expected to cause a global warming that could raise sea level a few feet in the next century. This paper examines four options by which barrier-island communities could respond, focusing on Long Beach Island, New Jersey. For the next few decades, the most common response will probably be to raise the islands in place by pumping sand onto beaches and building lots. Eventually, as costs increase, many communities may accept a gradual landward retreat. Nevertheless, federal agencies that encourage risky development, state agencies that discourage it, residents who feel entitled to subsidized coastal protection, and environmentalists insensitive to constitutional property rights will all have to compromise for a rational solution to be possible. Local officials on barrier islands should begin to hold public meetings to develop a public consensus on the appropriate response to sea level rise.
Notes
Cover title. Includes bibliographical references. Microfiche.