Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 12 OF 195

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Does hazardous waste matter? : evidence from the housing market and the Superfund program /
Author Greenstone, Michael,
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Gallagher, Justin.
Publisher National Bureau of Economic Research,
Year Published 2005
OCLC Number 62365481
Subjects Hazardous waste site remediation--Economic aspects--United States. ; Housing--Prices--United States. ; USA.
Additional Subjects United States.--Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://papers.nber.org/papers/11790
National Bureau of Economic Research http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11790
Volltext http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11790.pdf
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBM  H11.N265 no.11790 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 11/29/2005
Collation 49, [19] pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.
Notes
"November 2005." Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (pages 46-49).
Contents Notes
"Approximately $30 billion (2000$) has been spent on Superfund clean-ups of hazardous waste sites, and remediation efforts are incomplete at roughly half of the 1,500 Superfund sites. This study estimates the effect of Superfund clean-ups on local housing price appreciation. We compare housing price growth in the areas surrounding the first 400 hazardous waste sites to be cleaned up through the Superfund program to the areas surrounding the 290 sites that narrowly missed qualifying for these clean-ups. We cannot reject that the clean-ups had no effect on local housing price growth, nearly two decades after these sites became eligible for them. This finding is robust to a series of specification checks, including the application of a quasi-experimental regression discontinuity design based on knowledge of the selection rule. Overall, the preferred estimates suggest that the benefits of Superfund clean-ups as measured through the housing market are substantially lower than the $43 million mean cost of Superfund clean-ups"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site.