Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 22 OF 891

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Airborne asbestos health assessment update.
Author Nicholson, William J.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office.
Publisher Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1986
Report Number EPA/600/8-84/003F
Stock Number PB86-242864
OCLC Number 48715386
Subjects Asbestos dust. ; Asbestosis--Canada. ; Asbestosis--United States. ; Asbestos cement--Environmental aspects--Canada. ; Asbestos cement--Environmental aspects--United States. ; Air--Pollution--Canada. ; Air--Pollution--United States.
Additional Subjects Asbestos ; Industrial medicine ; Lung cancer ; Exposure ; Malignant neoplasms ; Mesothelioma ; Health risks ; Air pollution effects(Humans) ; Occupational safety and health ; Cancer
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=20009EBT.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB86-242864 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 217 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
Recent data from population studies strengthened the association of asbestos with disease. Lung cancer and mesothelioma are the most important asbestos-related causes of death. The data suggest that the excess risk of lung cancer from asbestos exposure is proportional to cumulative exposure (duration X intensity) and underlying risk in the absence of exposure. Risk of death from mesothelioma appears proportional to cumulative exposure in a given period. Animal studies confirm the human epidemiological results. All major asbestos varieties produce lung cancer and mesothelioma, with only limited differences in carcinogenic potency. One can extrapolate the risks of asbestos cancers from occupational exposures, although the uncertainty is approximately tenfold or greater. Calculations of asbestos unit risk values are uncertain and based on subjective estimates because of the following limitations in data: (1) extrapolation from high occupational levels to much lower ambient levels; (2) the uncertainty of mass-to-fiber conversion; (3) statistical uncertainties; (4) various biases and confounding aspects of medical data; and very importantly, (5) nonrepresentative exposure estimates.
Notes
"June 1986." Includes bibliographical references (pages 178-198). "EPA/600/8-84/003F." Microfiche.