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RECORD NUMBER: 257 OF 2644

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Calibration of Greenhouse and the Field for Survival of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms.
Author Donegan, K. ; Armstrong, J. ; Matyac, C. ; Seidler., R. J. ;
CORP Author Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Publisher Oct 90
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/3-90/085;
Stock Number PB91-109975
Additional Subjects Survival ; Microorganisms ; Genetics engineering ; Environmental transport ; Release ; Bacteria ; Greenhouses ; Plants(Botany) ; Populations ; Trends ; Field tests ; Sampling ; Humidity ; Light(Visible radiation) ; Temperature ; Response ; Erwinia herbicola ; Pseudomonas syringae ; Klebsiella planticola
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NTIS  PB91-109975 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/04/1991
Collation 37p
Abstract
Because of current concerns regarding the release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) into the environment, the fate, survival, and effects of many GEMs will need to be evaluated in small-scale releases performed in controlled, contained environments. In the study, the use of greenhouses for predicting the results of field releases, and the influence of bacterial genus, plant genus and environmental conditions on bacterial survival in the greenhouse and the field were investigated. Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas syringae, and Klebsiella planticola were sprayed on oat plants (Avena sativa) and bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) in one greenhouse experiment and in two field experiments. Plants were sampled, and 21 days after bacteria were applied and temperature, relative humidity, and incident light were recorded per minute and averaged per hour. Despite the application of equivalent bacterial concentrations in the experiments, bacterial populations after only one day post-application were significantly lower in the field experiments as compared to the greenhouse experiment.