Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 1160 OF 1185

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Waste Minimization Trends Report (1991-1998).
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Solid Waste.
Publisher 17 Sep 2002
Year Published 2002
Report Number EPA/530/R-02/007;
Stock Number PB2003-105836
Additional Subjects Waste management ; Hazardous materials ; Chemicals ; Waste disposal ; Minimization ; Industrial wastes ; Chemical wastes ; Toxic hazards ; Trends ; Government policies ; Pollution prevention ; Pollution regulations ; US EPA ; Waste minimization ; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA) ; Toxics Release Inventory(TRI)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P100PW8X.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB2003-105836 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 07/23/2003
Collation 258p
Abstract
Congress established the national policy for the United States that wherever feasible, the generation of hazardous waste is to be reduced or eliminated as expeditiously as possible (RCRA Section 1003(b)). The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 further stressed the importance of reducing pollution at its source. In 1993, Congress passed the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA; U.S. Congress, 1993) requiring federal agencies to define their goals and objectives and to track progress towards them. In order to comply with GPRA requirements, EPA identified a variety of performance goals related to its major environmental programs. One of the goals EPA set for its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste minimization program is to reduce, as a nation, the presence of certain chemicals in hazardous wastes by 50 percent by the year 2005, compared to amounts generated in 1991. In discussion with numerous stakeholders, EPA heard that waste minimization progress may be encouraged by focusing on a priority list of chemicals, and measuring results over time.