Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 308 OF 1201

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Development of analytical techniques to measure human exposure to fuel additives /
Author Johnson, Donald E. ; Tillery, John B. ; Hosenfeld, John M. ; Register., James W.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Johnson, Donald E.
CORP Author Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, Tex.
Publisher U.S. Environemental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1974
Report Number EPA/650-1-74-003; SwRI-01-3451-001; EPA-68-02-0595
Stock Number PB-232 124
OCLC Number 09307544
Subjects Air--Pollution. ; Fuel--Additives.
Additional Subjects Exhaust gases ; Fuel additives ; Air pollution ; Monitors ; Sampling ; Public health ; Lead ; Manganese ; Copper ; Zinc ; Residues ; Hair ; Blood analysis ; Cadmium ; Tissues(Biology) ; Feces ; Metals ; Exposure ; Urine ; Heavy metal excretion ; Air pollution effects(Humans)
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100QCLQ.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 650/1-74-003 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 04/26/1996
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 650-1-74-003 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 06/24/2013
EJBD  EPA 650-1-74-003 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 04/29/2016
EKAM  EPA-650/ 1-74-003 Region 4 Library/Atlanta,GA 01/31/1997
ELBD  EPA 650-1-74-003 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 09/22/2006
NTIS  PB-232 124 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation iii, 161 pages : tables ; 28 cm
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate analytical and sampling methodology for measuring amount of exposure and health effects of fuel additives to urban and rural populations. Both human exposure to normal levels of fuel additives present in urban traffic and to the high concentration under occupational conditions such as attendants in garages and parking lots and to policemen working in heavily trafficked areas. Fuel additives studied included the heavy metals, lead, manganese, copper, and zinc. Also measured in human tissue samples was the fuel impurity, cadmium. Trace metals in hair were determined to reflect long-term exposure. Blood and urine samples reflected short-term exposure. Feces measurement for lead and cadmium provided an estimation of dietary contributions.
Notes
"EPA/650-1-74-003." "March 1974."