Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 38 OF 53

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Sewage sludge versus commercial methods for reclaiming strip-mine soils /
Author Abron-Robinson, Lilia A.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Weinberger, Leon W.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory,
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA/600-S2-84-155
OCLC Number 11960631
Subjects Strip mining--United States. ; Reclamation of land--United States. ; Sewage sludge--United States.
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000TI32.PDF
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000TI32.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-S2-84-155 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 11/28/2017
EJBD  EPA 600-S2-84-155 In Binder Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 08/03/2018
Collation 3 pages ; 28 cm
Notes
Caption title. At head of title: Project summary. Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche. "Nov. 1984." "EPA/600-S2-84-155."
Contents Notes
"Two types of methods for revegetating strip-mined soils were compared with regard to cost, feasibility, and environmental impacts: the use of municipal sewage sludge and commercial methods. The in-depth investigation included visits to strip-mined sites being reclaimed with sewage sludge and a literature review to gather data on strip-mined land reclaimed with commercial methods. The literature review was necessary because adequate data were not available otherwise. Cost comparisons of the two reclamation methods were made using only those costs associated with renovation after the sludge or commercial materials were delivered to the site. This comparison indicated that reclamation of strip-mined land with sewage sludge costs roughly the same as commercial methods. The study also used available data to show that both commercial methods and sewage sludge application could be used successfully to reclaim strip-mined soils with no adverse environmental impacts. Selection of the reclamation practice should be based on site-specific evaluations of cost, social. political, and aesthetic factors."