Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 11 OF 910

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title A citizen's guide to radon : the guide to protecting yourself and your family from radon.
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Air and Radiation.; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Indoor Environments Division,
Year Published 2009
Report Number EPA 402/K-09/001
Stock Number PB2012-104186
OCLC Number 429073380
Subjects Radon. ; Radon--Prevention.
Additional Subjects Radon ; Citizen guide ; Radioactive gas ; Testing ; Reduction systems
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS93503
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P1002W4V.PDF
https://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P1002W4V.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 402/K-09-001 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 03/15/2010
EKBD  EPA-402/K-09/001 Research Triangle Park Library/RTP, NC 10/20/2014
ELBD  EPA 402-K-09-001 AWBERC Library/Cincinnati,OH 08/19/2009
NTIS  PB2012-104186 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 07/11/2012
Collation 15 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Abstract
You cant see radon. And you cant smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home. Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year. Thats because when you breathe air containing radon, you can get lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths. Radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon can be found all over the U.S. It can get into any type of buildinghomes, offices, and schoolsand result in a high indoor radon level. But you and your family are most likely to get your greatest exposure at home, where you spend most of your time. Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. EPA also recommends testing in schools. Testing is inexpensive and easyit should only take a few minutes of your time. Millions of Americans have already tested their homes for radon (see page 5).
Notes
Cover title. "January 2009." "EPA 402/K-09/001." "Www.epa.gov/radon."