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RECORD NUMBER: 34 OF 204

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Creating public value : strategic management in government /
Author Moore, Mark H., ; Moore, Mark Harrison.
Publisher Harvard University Press,
Year Published 1995
OCLC Number 32430598
ISBN 0674175573; 9780674175570; 0674175581; 9780674175587
Subjects Civil service ethics. ; Government executives. ; Public administration. ; Strategic planning. ; Secteur public. ; Entreprises publiques. ; Gestion. ; Evaluation conomique. ; Réformes administratives. ; Overheidsmanagement. ; Ambtenaren. ; Strategisch management. ; èOffentliches Unternehmen ; USA ; MORAL ASPECTS. ; Ejecutivos del estado
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJBM  JF1525.E8M66 1995 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 06/24/2005
Collation xiii, 402 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 311-395) and index.
Contents Notes
1. Managerial Imagination -- pt. I. Envisioning Public Value. 2. Defining Public Value. 3. Organizational Strategy in the Public Sector -- pt. II. Building Support and Legitimacy. 4. Mobilizing Support, Legitimacy, and Coproduction: The Functions of Political Management. 5. Advocacy, Negotiation, and Leadership: The Techniques of Political Management -- pt. III. Delivering Public Value. 6. Reengineering Public Sector Production: The Function of Operational Management. 7. Implementing Strategy: The Techniques of Operational Management -- Conclusion: Acting for a Divided, Uncertain Society. A seminal figure in the field of public management, Mark Moore presents his summation of fifteen years of research, observation, and teaching about what public sector executives should do to improve the performance of public enterprises. Useful for both practicing public executives and those who teach them, this book explicates some of the richest of several hundred cases used at Harvard's Kennedy School and illuminates their broader lessons for government managers. Moore addresses four questions that have long bedeviled public administration: What should citizens and their representatives expect and demand from public executives? What sources can public managers consult to learn what is valuable for them to produce? How should public managers cope with inconsistent and fickle political mandates? How can public managers find room to innovate?