Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 691 OF 1687

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Estimation of seasonal and annual acidic deposition through aggregation of three-day episodic periods /
Author Samson, Perry J. ; Samson, P. J. ; Brook, J. R. ; Sillman, S.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Brook, Jeffrey R.
Sillman, Sanford.
CORP Author Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences.;Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.
Publisher Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA 600-3-90-059
Stock Number PB90-252628
OCLC Number 832772707
Subjects Acid deposition--Mathematical models. ; Acid deposition--Environmental aspects--United States.
Additional Subjects Acidification ; Air pollution ; Deposition ; Agglomeration ; Mathematical models ; Meteorological data ; Wind direction ; Estimates ; Stratification ; Atmospheric chemistry ; Precipitation(Meteorology) ; Statistical analysis ; Atmospheric diffusion ; Seasonal variations ; Forecasting ; Sulfates ; Eastern Region(North America) ; Periodic variations ; Regional Acid Deposition Model
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9101VYAI.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EJAD  EPA 600/3-90-059 Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA 09/02/2014
EJBD ARCHIVE EPA 600-3-90-059 Headquarters Library/Washington,DC 04/02/2013
NTIS  PB90-252628 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 12/03/1990
Collation 1 v. (various pagings) : maps, charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
A method for aggregating episodic deposition estimates has been developed and used to identify which meteorological situations merit simulation by RADM based on their likelihood of producing sulfate (SO4(-2)) wet deposition at multiple locations across eastern North America, their frequency of occurrence, and their seasonality. The aggregation technique has been performed using four years (1982 - 1985) of precipitation chemistry data from the Utility Acid Precipitation Sampling Program (UAPSP). The method developed during the project improves upon random selection. It is based on the stratification of three-day periods into categories of similar 850 mb wind flow across eastern North America. The aggregation project has provided the RADM project with a list of simulation periods which represent the range of meteorological patterns over eastern North America. The selection of storm types was based on their likelihood of producing SO4(-2) wet deposition at multiple locations across eastern North America, their frequency of occurrence, and their seasonality. The project has also provided the RADM project with scaling factors for use in weighing episodic simulation results to seasonal and annual deposition.
Notes
"May 1, 1990."--Cover. References: p.144-146.
Contents Notes
The Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) simulates the complex physical and chemical processes involved in the formation of acidic deposition. However, because of the complexity of RADM it has only been applied to selected episodes of a few days duration. While the detail provided by RADM is highly desirable to understand the interactions between emissions and deposition on a storm-by-storm basis there is also a need for understanding the probable long-term relationship between changing emissions patterns and deposition. The cost of simulating and interpreting seasonal or annual deposition paterns using RADM directly would be high. A method for aggregating episodic deposition estimates has been developed and used to identify which meteorological situation merit simulation by RADM based on thie likelihood of producing sulfate (SOb4s=) wet deposition at multiple locations across eastern North America, their frequency of occurrence, and their seasonality. The aggregation approach is based on four years (1982-1985) of meteorological and precipitation chemistry data. The aggregation approach is based on the stratification of three-day periods into categories of similar 850 mb wind flow across eastern North America and subsequent selection of 30 RADM simulation periods from this stratification which represent the range pf storm patterns present over eastern North America. The program has also provided the RADM project with scaling factors ofr use in weighing episodic simulation results to seasonal and annual deposition. The approach is shown to improve upon the use of arandom selection process in reproducing seasonal and annual wet deposition pattersn.