Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 32 OF 40

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Sediment Reworking and Transport in Eastern Lake Superior: In situ Rare Earth Element Tracer Studies.
Author Krezoski, J. R. ;
CORP Author Wisconsin Univ.-Milwaukee. Center for Great Lakes Studies.;Environmental Research Lab., Duluth, MN.;Wisconsin Univ.-Madison. Sea Grant Inst.;National Undersea Research Program, Groton, CT.
Publisher c1989
Year Published 1989
Report Number CONTRIB-320; EPA-R-813538; EPA/600/J-89/034;
Stock Number PB90-100652
Additional Subjects Lake Superior ; Sediments ; Rare earth elements ; Site surveys ; Radioactive materials ; Neutron activation analysis ; Pollen ; Reprints ; Tracer studies ; Sediment-water interfaces ; Environmental transport ; Water pollution sampling ; In-situ processing ; Path of pollutants
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB90-100652 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 03/10/1990
Collation 10p
Abstract
Considerable attention has been focused on understanding modes and rates of post-depositional sediment reworking in the Great Lakes with the result that virtually all theoretical models describing particle dynamics or reconstructing the history of pollutant input in the lakes include surficial sediment reworking terms. A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the profundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-capture cross-section REE, was added at a concentration 30,000 greater than found naturally in the lake sediments. After 23 days the study site was reoccupied and eleven submersible-taken punch cores were collected from within and around the labeled area. Verticle core sections were then examined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. These results demonstrate the utility of in situ tracer studies at profundal depths and suggest that longer-term studies will permit accurate measurement of post-depositional redistribution processes at the sediment-water interface of freshwater and marine environments.