Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 151 OF 887

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title CTDMPLUS: A Dispersion Model for Sources Near Complex Topography. Part 1. Technical Formulations.
Author Perry, S. G. ;
CORP Author Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab. ;National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Div.
Publisher c1992
Year Published 1992
Report Number EPA/600/J-92/363;
Stock Number PB93-107076
Additional Subjects Air quality display model ; Air pollution ; Computerized simulation ; Environmental transport ; Point sources ; Atmospheric diffusion ; Plumes ; Air flow ; Wind(Meteorology) ; Convection ; Terrain models ; Meteorological data ; Reprints ; Complex Terrain Dispersion Model
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
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Status
NTIS  PB93-107076 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/08/1993
Collation 15p
Abstract
The Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDMPLUS), a point-source, steady-state, model for complex terrain applications, is described. The model is unique in the manner in which it simulates the flow and plume distortion near fully defined three-dimensional terrain. Emphasis is given to windward side impacts. Simplicity is maintained by applying flow distortion corrections to flat-terrain, Gaussian and bi-Gaussian pollutant dstributions. The algorithms for stable and neutral conditions are based on the well established concept of a dividing streamline. These algorithms have been developed with the use of data from three major plume-impaction field studies and a number of fluid modeling studies. The algorithms for plumes released into convective layers are based on recent understanding of the convective boundary layer through fluid modeling, numerical modeling, and field studies. The non-Gaussian nature of vertical dispersion is accounted for; lateral dispersion is modeled with the aid of convective scaling concepts.