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RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 9

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Biological and chemical methodologies for assessing human exposure to airborne mutagens indoors. {microfiche}
Author Matsushita, H. ; Goto, S. ; Endo, O. ; Koyano, M. ; Tanabe., K.
CORP Author Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. ;National Inst. of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan). ;Azabu Univ., Sagamihara (Japan). School of Veterinary Medicine.
Publisher US Environmental Protection Agency, Health Affects Research Laboratory
Year Published 1990
Report Number EPA/600/D-90/162
Stock Number PB91-133025
OCLC Number 45623234
Additional Subjects Mutagens ; Carcinogens ; Exposure ; Aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons ; Salmonella typhimurium ; Smoke ; Personnel monitoring ; Foreign technology ; Indoor air pollution ; Mutagenicity tests ; Air pollution effects(Humans) ; Benzo(a)pyrene ; Fluorimetry ; High pressure liquid chromatography
Holdings
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NTIS  PB91-133025 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 01/01/1988
Collation 8 p.: ill. ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Two highly sensitive methods have been developed and applied to the monitoring of personal exposure to airborne mutagens and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The automatic method for PAH analysis consists of ultrasonic extraction and multicolumn HPLC/computer controlled spectrofluorometric detection, by which 7 PAHs in indoor and/or personal particulate samples were analyzed. Concentration of PAHs, e.g., benzo(a)pyrene, indoors increased remarkably by smoking in a poorly ventilated room. The second method, an ultra microsuspension forward mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium TM677, is about 100 times more sensitive than the ordinary Ames mutation bioassay. Mutagenicity of airborne particles collected by personal sampling was determined by this method. Personal exposures to ETS were greatest for smokers, followed by passive smokers and lowest for nonsmokers suspension.