Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 2 OF 7

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Evaluation of EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Method 603 (Modified).
Author Lucas, S. V. ; Cole, T. F. ; Riggin, A. ; Cooke, W. M. ;
CORP Author Battelle Columbus Labs., OH.;Environmental Monitoring and Support Lab., Cincinnati, OH.
Year Published 1984
Report Number EPA-68-03-1760; EPA/600/4-85/001;
Stock Number PB85-146629
Additional Subjects Chromatographic analysis ; Water analysis ; Water pollution ; Revision ; Industrial wastes ; Chemical analysis ; Gas chromatography ; Laboratory equipment ; EPA method 603 ; Water pollution detection ; Publicly owned waste water treatment ; Purge and trap method
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB85-146629 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/21/1988
Collation 76p
Abstract
USEPA Method 603 was modified and evaluated with newly established chromatographic conditions for the determination of acrolein, acrylonitrile, and acetonitrile. Method detection limits (MDLs) for the new chromatographic conditions were found to be equivalent to those previously specified in Method 603 for acrolein and acrylonitrile (0.7 and 0.5 micrograms/l, respectively). The method detection limit found for acetonitrile in this work was 2.7 micrograms/l. The method was found to be accurate and precise for the determination of all three method parameters. Recoveries and precisions were determined at two spiking levels in each of three matrices, namely, reagent water, Columbus Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) wastewater, and industrial wastewater. Acrolein was not stable in the industrial wastewater even though the water was buffered at pH 4.5 before spiking. For the other two matrices, the acrolein recovery ranged from 80 to 104% (average, 94%) and the precisions ranged from 1 to 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) (average, 3% RSD). The loss of acrolein due to apparent chemical degradation in the industrial wastewater underscores the current lack of understanding of the chemical factors that control the stability of acrolein in aqueous systems.